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Browse our blog to learn more about thin film and conformal coating processes, material, and application. Find out more about HZO and how our solutions can help your market.

ADAS Design and Validation for the Real World - Automotive Coatings

Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) continue to expand in features and functionalities. Standard offerings may include adaptive cruise control, park assist, blind-spot..

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Parylene Conformal Coatings - Parylene Conformality Explained

Parylene (p-polyxylylene) conformal coatings are unique due to their capacity to be polymerized and deposited by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method onto surfaces near room..

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An Overview of Our Parylene Coating Equipment

The original development of our coating technology began in 2007. As a coating company that now licenses thin-film protective layering technology on the back of more than 200..

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What is Parylene Coating Used For? Is it Right For My Project?

For decades, Parylene coatings, including Parylene C, Parylene F (VT-4), and Parylene N, have been trusted to enhance the reliability and performance of printed circuit boards and..

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Parylene masking equipment

Parylene Masking - General Concepts Explained

Conformal coatings are an excellent way to increase the reliability of electronic components in harsh environments. However, this protection can be too much of a good thing..

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Parylene Chemical Resistance Properties - Overview

Choosing a conformal coating can be a complex decision that entails understanding the environment your electronic products will be operating in and taking stock of the threats to..

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Parylene Biocompatibility Properties

As a long-proven biocompatible material, Parylene conforms to ISO-10993 and is USP Class VI implantable material. Its properties make it ideal for biological and medical..

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Parylene N Properties Explained Datasheet PDF Download

Parylene is the generic name for poly-para-xylylenes. These conformal coatings come in several varieties, including Parylene C, Parylene F (VT-4), and Parylene N. Parylene..

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Parylene chemical formula on a dollar bill

How Much Does Parylene Coating Cost? - All Things Considered

Parylene coatings are known for robust protection from liquids, corrosion, chemicals, and strong electrical activity at a fraction of the thickness of alternative coatings, such..

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Engineer Looking at Coating With Equipment

Parylene C Datasheet (PDF Download) - Properties Explained

Parylene conformal coatings come in various types, including Parylene C, Parylene N, and Parylene F (VT-4), with decades of trusted performance in critical industries and..

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Engineer removing Parylene coating

Parylene Coating Removal - Methods & Explanation

In the last blog post in our removing conformal coating series, we discussed removing conventional conformal coatings, such as polyurethane, acrylic, epoxy, and silicone, from..

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IoT - Coating Consistency is Key

IoT sensors aggregate and send data to IoT dashboards, simplifying critical, complex decisions quickly. One key area where this is particularly true is the utilization of sensor..

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Example of Parylene optical properties

Parylene Optical Properties - UV Light Interactions, Refractive Index

With Parylene, you always have a clear and accurate view due to its optical properties. Although the Parylene deposition process begins with white to off-white dimer powder, the..

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Parylene Temperature Range - Extreme Hot & Cold Temperatures

Do you need product protection that can withstand temperature extremes? Parylene may be a good option if you utilize the correct type. Learn more about why Parylene is used..

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Parylene Coating Thickness – How Much is Enough?

If you are considering a Parylene coating for your printed circuit board assembly, you may wonder what thickness you should use. You may have surmised that the more coating, the..

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Coating engineer inspecting parylene film on pcb

Parylene - Different Types & Properties Explained

Parylene is a chemical compound applied to substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Because Parylene coating deposits onto the surface molecule by molecule, it forms a..

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Solving Weather & Water Challenges For Smart Farms

It’s a Small World, After All The world’s population is projected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030, an unprecedented increase approaching fast. This looming surge will compound our..

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ADAS Design and Validation for the Real World - Automotive Coatings

June 15, 2023 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Properties, Thin Film Applications

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Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) continue to expand in features and functionalities. Standard offerings may include adaptive cruise control, park assist, blind-spot detection, lane departure, RADAR, emergency braking, tire pressure monitoring, and LiDAR systems.
 

When consumers purchase a vehicle with ADAS safety features, they believe they have a layer of protection to be entirely relied on. In reality, though, without a methodical, effective ADAS component design that accounts for real-life situations, these features are no more than crutches.

In addition to the ethical argument that safety should be an underlying principle of ADAS design, liability concerns create a business case for ADAS components that dependably function in the typical automotive service environment.

As ADAS designers evaluate the risk of harm, they may ask about the probability of exposure to an element or situation that could cause failure. They may ascertain how severe the resulting damage may be and determine how controllable the issue is if it should occur.

The risk of harm is high in instances such as premature ADAS component failure due to harsh environments. ADAS PCBAs and components will inevitably encounter corrosive elements, humidity, thermal shock, water ingress, and other environmental factors that compromise electronics. If this ADAS component should fail as a result, consumers relying on a safety feature could incur severe damage and liability, and in terms of controllability, there is not much that can be done upon critical component failure.

ADAS component reliability through harsh environments is a high-risk issue. Therefore, design engineers must prioritize safeguarding ADAS components from failing in these circumstances and verifying their safety in real-life situations. Testing and validation can become problematic when legacy methods such as gaskets and seals bolster ADAS reliability.

 

ADAS features in harsh environments

 

Possible Issues with ADAS Testing Protocols and Traditional Reliability Methods

Issues with ADAS reliability testing protocols may include:

● Testing must confirm that a system will handle situations that can be predicted and that ADAS will reliably work under unknown circumstances.
● Proper validation and verification can entail testing many conditions, particularly as vehicle design shifts towards fully autonomous vehicles.
● Testing for scenarios on a test track may be impractical when methods such as seals and gaskets are used for ADAS reliability.

For example, to test that a seal will continue to prevent ingress while exposed to vibration, you might have to wait for weather conditions to occur naturally, including snow, rain, or humidity. Although you can use equipment to mimic these weather conditions, this will add to testing complexity.

It's Possible to Simplify ADAS Reliability

As noted, seals and gaskets can become dislodged in many situations, which would have to be recreated and accounted for to validate and verify ADAS component reliability if they are the primary protection method. This unpredictability raises complications during the design and validation process.

Furthermore, as more features are built into vehicles, more components will need to fit in. The bulk of seals, potting, and traditional conformal coatings can lead to more design challenges. These conventional methods can also complicate lightweighting efforts as they add unnecessary weight.

HZO’s proven, trusted Parylene coatings solve these testing and design challenges. These conformal coatings come in several types, including Parylene N, Parylene F (VT-4), and Parylene C, demonstrating excellent performance in mission-critical applications for decades, in part due to uniform coverage, barrier properties, and less stress on mechanical structures.

 

HZO Coatings for Automotive Corrosion Protection

We’ve proven that our coatings can deliver as much – or more – flexibility, fungus resistance, flammability, dielectric withstanding voltage, thermal shock, moisture, and insulation resistance at a fraction of the mass of conventional coatings, passing the IPC CC-830C test at 50% of the film thinness. Unlike seals and gaskets, Parylene does not stop providing protection when exposed to unpredictable situations, such as drops and falls. The coating is well studied and, when appropriately applied by engineers who understand the parameters of an application, will withstand the lifecycle of the product it is enabling.

 

Class Type Specimen – Average Coating Thickness [μm]
    1 2 3 4
XY Parylene N 25 25 23 23
XY Parylene C 31 30 30 32
XY Parylene F 46 36 43 29
AR/UR Acrylic 73 73 69 72
SR Silicone 102 99 114 154
AR/UR Acrylated Polyurethane 91 91 107 107

 

Below, you can see how our coatings performed in automotive validation tests.

Contents Requirements Test Results
Operations Test Operate for 24 hours at 23 Degrees C Operate for 24 hours at 23 Degrees C
Coating Property No Pinhole and Uncoated Area No pin hole and uncoated area
Coating thickness 225±3 [μm]
Electrical Test Dielectric withstanding voltage: Over 1.5 [kV]
Insulation resistance: Over 10 [GΩ]
IPC-B-25A standard test board pattern Dv
Over 1.5 [Kv]
Over 10 [GΩ]
Corrosion Test Salt spray (35 °C, NACI, 96 hours):
No corrosion on chip leads
No corrosion on chip leads

 

 

Enhanced Component Reliability and Increased Resistance to Fluids and Oils

 

The automotive operating environment includes exposure to chemicals such as oil, antifreeze, standing water, and cleaning fluids. HZO Parylene coatings offer dependable protection for various leak, environmental, splash, and submersion test requirements.

 

Protection Characteristics Unprotected PCB Mechanical Seal Silicone/Acrylic Coatings Parylene Coating
Protection Barrier None Good, but can be compromised with drops & temperature. Good, but can be thick & porous depending on the application. Excellent. Can peel if not properly applied.
Hydrophobic No No Yes Partial
Thickness N.A. Millimeters μm – Millimeters 2μm – 50μm
Protection Against Water Poor Good – Ingress Poor – Penetration Good Excellent
Salt/Chemical Protection Poor Poor Varies Excellent
Durability Low Varies Varies High
Submersion Test Time to Failure Seconds (IP Rating N.A.) Varies Varies Days to Weeks (IPX7 – IPX8)

 

 

When used as a redundant solution along with legacy methods, our coatings can provide more robust, reliable protection and the ability to reduce sealing, thereby minimizing spacing and weight issues. As the visual below indicates, a mechanical seal can easily be breached. With HZO’s Parylene protection, moisture ingress is not an issue.

 

 

Contact HZO for Automotive Component Coatings

 

If you are interested in Parylene and would like to speak to our industry-leading applications engineering team, please reach out with a message or fill out a quote form to understand your application needs and provide a tailored solution.

 
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Parylene Conformal Coatings - Parylene Conformality Explained

June 6, 2023 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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Parylene (p-polyxylylene) conformal coatings are unique due to their capacity to be polymerized and deposited by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method onto surfaces near room temperature. As a result of this process, pinhole-free, high-purity, extremely thin coatings are formed out of dimer materials.

Regarding conforming to complex or unusual surfaces, Parylene is one of the best polymer coatings for moisture resistance. This attribute and the fact that Parylene is a stable chemical compound that creates an excellent barrier make it the optimal choice where resilient electronic products are a mandate. But why is Parylene coating conformal?

Download HZO’s Parylene datasheet to learn more about Parylene’s properties

 

Why is Parylene Coating Conformal?

Liquid coatings with application methods such as dipping, brushing, or spraying may cause the coatings to exhibit meniscus forces or pull away from edges, which does not occur with Paylene deposition. With CVD, the coating penetrates around and beneath closely spaced components with consistent, uniform buildup, allowing for substantial physical and electrical protection with a substantially thinner layer than conventional coatings.

 

Parylene Deposition Process

Thus, the Parylene coating process explains why Parylene is so conformal. You can read an in-depth description of the CVD process versus PECVD in our blog on the subject; below are some general benefits of CVD:

Download a visual explanation of the process

 

  • CVD produces coatings with complete coverage even around and beneath closely spaced chips and wires.
  • CVD deposits Parylene molecule by molecule onto substrates with precision and control.
  • The Parylene deposition process requires no catalyst, hardener, or heat curing.
  • Polymerization does not release harmful by-products, as with other conformal coatings.

Chemical vapor deposition process

 

When Parylene polymers are deposited from the vapor phase with the CVD process, all sides of a component are impinged by the gaseous monomer and uniformly coated. This feature of the process is responsible for why Parylene coating is conformal.

 

Importance of Conformality and Uniformity

Truly conformal coverage occurs when a film precisely follows the coated component’s geometry. Conformality allows for the optimization of surface properties regardless of the shape of the part and ensures that microdevice properties such as conductance do not vary due to significant variations in thickness. Uniform thickness is critical to prevent proper reinforcement against degradation and wear.

 

Parylene Conformality Compared to Liquid Coatings

 

Parylene conformality

 

Along with performance concerns, achieving uniformity improves production factors such as yield rates and repeatability. With the chemical vapor deposition process, engineers have confidence that there will not be thickness fluctuations from product to product and that specs are being met. By ensuring optimum coating deposition performance is met, you can lower your total cost of ownership by keeping your repeatability and yield on target.

 

Parylene Conformal Coating Service with HZO

However, although a process may achieve repeatable, uniform thickness distributions, this does not mean it is viable for your company – uptime and upfront costs must also be considered. Parylene has traditionally only been used for mission-critical applications such as medical products. HZO, a turnkey CVD process provider, has made Parylene and its application feasible for most industries for years. Our engineers have crafted capital coating equipment that addresses upfront cost concerns and makes Parylene scalable. If you are interested in the powerful barrier properties of Parylene films and the benefits of its vacuum deposition process, reach out today to speak to one of our engineers.

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An Overview of Our Parylene Coating Equipment

June 6, 2023 / by Ryan Moore posted in Parylene, Coating Process

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The original development of our coating technology began in 2007. As a coating company that now licenses thin-film protective layering technology on the back of more than 200 patent filings, it can be said that we’ve come a long way since our humble beginnings. HZO now successfully protects millions of complicated digital devices from the ill effects of liquids, sweat, humidity, dust, or other contaminants.

Today we wanted to give a little nod to our origin story and provide a high-level introduction to a material that serves as a building block of our technology.

Learn more about Parylene C and Parylene Type N

Parylene Protection

Parylene (or Poly(p-xylylene) as it’s also known) is a protective layering material deposited with a chemical vapor deposition process. The resulting material is a moisture-resistant, dielectric thin film barrier that has been used for over five decades on a wide range of corrosion-resistant products. Parylene is biocompatible, has good optical properties, and is chemical-resistant. Think big. Think powerful. Parylene has been protecting equipment, components, and products used throughout some of the most advanced industries in the world.

Read more about why Parylene is used 

HZO has developed its proprietary technology utilizing Parylene as a building block and, over the years, has developed its chemistry, specialized processes, automated Parylene masking equipment, Parylene removal processes, systems, and methods of commercialization that together form a powerful and unique conformal protective solution.

 

Parylene Overview

So why have most people never heard of it? A major obstacle to Parylene becoming more widely adopted in other markets and on many other products, including consumer devices, has been largely due to the cost of Parylene deposition systems and parylene coating material.

Learn more about Parylene coating cost considerations

Not only does the Parylene deposition system and raw material have a history of high price, but over the years, there have been challenges associated with things like scalability, manufacturing integration, device complexity, and what has historically been a manual process for masking and damasking sensitive areas that need to be protected from the protective layering (i.e., the process of protecting certain components from the protective layering material).

To the credit of Parylene companies that have been in that market for much of this journey, the technology has improved dramatically over time, and the material has a sterling reputation in certain markets where development has been focused. But what about other industries that need the same kind of powerful protection?

Learn More Parylene Temperature Range

 

HZO Parylene Coating Equipment Broadens the Scope

 

HZO Parylene coating equipment

 

HZO has broadened the usage scale for this powerful, organic material by making it available to companies and manufacturers that would not have considered it an option until now. The application’s utility is what separates HZO from other companies in the Parylene space.

We talk a lot about the power of the Total HZO Solution. This includes more than our thin-film protective layering technology that protects digital devices from corrosive liquids; it also includes the advances in equipment, integration, and highly specialized processes required to protect some of the world’s most complicated digital devices. Years of driving the technology forward have positioned HZO as the leader in developing custom solutions for digital devices, utilizing Parylene as part of that equation.

These ongoing innovations get passed on to every company we have the privilege of working with, and HZO has made the benefits of Parylene more accessible and affordable to more companies than ever before. As a result, more liquid, sweat and corrosion-resistant products are reaching the hands of consumers. The change in performance is starting to get noticed, and the cry for better protection on consumer devices has never been stronger.

Contact us today to learn more about how HZO is expanding, improving, and repurposing a powerful technology with a proven track record of keeping digital devices safe.

 

 
 
 
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What is Parylene Coating Used For? Is it Right For My Project?

June 6, 2023 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Thin Film Applications, Value of Coatings

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For decades, Parylene coatings, including Parylene C, Parylene F (VT-4), and Parylene N, have been trusted to enhance the reliability and performance of printed circuit boards and electronic components within critical industries and applications. Parylene films boast superiority in barrier properties and uniform coverage with a capacity to perform at comparably minimal coating thicknesses compared to conventional conformal coatings (liquid coatings).

Polymerized and deposited onto components at around room temperature by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process, Parylene coatings are free of defects and pinholes, have high purity, and are ideal for applications where reliability and performance are priorities.

 

What is Parylene Coating Used for? Useful Parylene Properties

Parylene is widely used due to various beneficial properties, including exceptional resistance to moisture, chemicals, and corrosion. Parylene is biocompatible, has beneficial optical properties, and offers additional value with impressive dielectric strength. Maintaining performance through high-temperature cycles and good thermal performance are also valuable attributes.

To see the specific properties of Parylene, you can view and download the HZO Parylene datasheet below. HZO Guardian Plus™ is the Parylene C offering, and HZO Guardian Zero™ is the Parylene N coating solution suitable for halogen-free applications.

 

Common Parylene Applications

 

 

Parylene is used in a wide range of industries, including:

Medical devices – As an FDA-approved material, Parylene has long been trusted with mission-critical medical applications, such as implanted devices. However, more medical wearable manufacturers are implementing Parylene to yield high reliability for devices such as hearing aids, CGMs, and trackers.
Industrial – Parylene’s properties are ideal for protecting applications in harsh industrial environments. Parylene can enhance the reliability of HVAC and oil and gas sensors, smart meters, and more.
Consumer Electronics – Parylene has become more widely used in electronics such as hearables, wearables, and smart home devices.
Automotive – Pinhole-free Parylene coatings enhance the reliability of automotive components, including EV batteries, ECUs, and ADAS components.

 

Bottom Line – Is Parylene Right for My Application?

Should you use Parylene for your next project? It is first necessary to ask yourself how much reliability and performance matter to answer this question.

When product designers have to be sure their electronics will work when needed, Parylene is worth considering. Additionally, Parylene coatings may be your best bet when reliability and lightweight protection are mandated. Some markets, such as aerospace and automotive that must minimize weight in every instance to support fuel efficiency may benefit from ultra-thin Parylene coating.

Some products do not require such strong barrier properties and corrosion resistance. It’s not necessary to ruggedize all devices. Doing so for products intended to be disposable would raise costs for the manufacturer and the consumer, delay the release of new products, and wouldn’t serve a purpose. The added cost of enhancing the reliability of disposable electronics that rarely contact harsh environments wouldn’t be cost or time-effective.

So, while it is not always necessary or even advisable to attain critical levels of reliable protection – when it is, Parylene coatings are the best defense.

Watch the webinar about Parylene’s proven corrosion resistance.

 

 

Parylene Services with HZO

parylene coating equipment

 

HZO is a Parylene service provider focusing on driving down costs associated with Parylene coating and increasing coating efficiency. While Parylene was once associated with only mission-critical applications such as military or aerospace, we have democratized the Parylene process for our customers of all industries. Our custom-built Parylene coating equipment reduces time to market and improves throughput and turnaround time so that virtually any industry can benefit from superior protection.

We also have industry-leading Parylene masking automation and expertise with Parylene removal

Contact us if you are considering Parylene for your project and want partners with industry knowledge and domain expertise.

 
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Parylene Masking - General Concepts Explained

January 28, 2022 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Process

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Conformal coatings are an excellent way to increase the reliability of electronic components in harsh environments. However, this protection can be too much of a good thing without processes to ensure certain areas remain coating-free.

These polymeric films can inhibit the critical functions of specific functions, but the masking process resolves this issue. With proper masking, you can benefit from conformal coating protection without losing functionality.

 

What is Masking?

Masking is applying a temporary film, boot, tape, or plug to designated assembly components to prevent them from being coated. While masking is important for conventional coatings such as acrylics, epoxies, urethanes, and silicones, Parylene has unique qualities that create a critical need to ensure it is done right.

Read about Parylene’s optical properties and Parylene biocompatibility.

 

Quick Introduction to Parylene Masking Techniques

For general guidance on conformal coating masking, the IPC-HDBK-830A handbook provides a good reference. However, because the coating process causes Parylene molecules to penetrate any surface area accessible to air, operators must ensure that all coating keep-out areas resist Parylene coating application, which requires domain expertise.

Read about Parylene C and Parylene N

HZO uses proprietary masking equipment, and our engineers build and customize techniques for every project. However, a short description of general methods follows below.

Parylene masking techniques typically involve precisely sizing materials such as tapes, form-in-place gaskets, and boots to designated masked regions. After applying materials to the appropriate areas, a masking operator will allow peelable masking materials to dry before starting the CVD process, coating the entire component. After coating, the masking material is carefully removed.

 

Why Proper Masking for Parylene Coating is So Critical

Parylene’s exceptionally high dielectric strength requires you to mask the right areas diligently. A PCBA coated with Parylene would benefit from electrical insulation protection. However, if the connectors on that same PCBA get covered, you won’t be able to plug it in or make connections.

Learn about Parylene Temperature Range

Another reason you must get your Parylene masking process correct is the film's incredible conformality. Where Parylene is allowed to penetrate, pins and moving parts will be completely encapsulated. Although this cohesive and thorough presence of coating is typically considered a benefit, additional cost and labor to remove the Parylene from the keep-out areas will be required with incorrect masking implementation. In other words, it’s best to prevent instead of rework, which can be challenging due to Parylene’s strong chemical resistance properties. 

 

Why It Can Also Be More Complicated

When you mask for Parylene application, the stakes are higher. Once it’s on, removing the coating will be a struggle without a knowledgeable partner with tools and techniques to make rework easier. The fact that masking for Parylene is also more complex, requiring more skill, raises further complications.

Without skill and experience, masking for Parylene is more challenging than general conformal coating masking due to the chemical vapor deposition process (CVD) used to apply the coating.

Learn about Parylene Thickness 

Unlike conventional conformal coatings applied as liquids, Parylene is applied as a vapor, which means you are masking against a gas. Therefore, a much better barrier is required with the Parylene masking process, as vapor can more easily bypass masking materials.

Other masking considerations include:

  • The need to validate if all components are hermetically sealed or not due to the vacuum nature of the CVD process
  • Chamber maintenance
  • Masking more than just keep-out locations may be required
  • The need for specific fixturing
  • Materials need to be thoroughly cured before coating, and outgassing should be avoided

The list below includes components that, in many cases, should not be coated:

  • MEMs
  • Actuators
  • Mating connectors and pins
  • Test points needed before assembly
  • Ground contacts

Parylene Coating With HZO

Parylene Masking with HZO

 

If you are masking for Parylene, you must implement the process correctly. Further, Parylene masking requires considerable expertise and experience to identify factors affecting masking success. These might include Parylene masking materials, the Parylene type, and the different areas that must be coated. Proper timing is also essential, as there is a relationship between the masking and coating processes. Any timing issues can impede coating quality. Managing electrostatic discharge is also a concern when masking.

Fortunately, our engineers have years of this experience, creating custom masking plans for customers with electronic products of all sizes, shapes, and functions. We have also developed industry-leading masking equipment that can automate and semi-automate the process for larger productions.

Reach out today if you would like a consultation to discuss why to use Parylene, our scalable Parylene coating equipment, or our automated masking processes that decrease Parylene coating costs

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Parylene Chemical Resistance Properties - Overview

January 21, 2022 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Protection Capabilities, Coating Properties

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Choosing a conformal coating can be a complex decision that entails understanding the environment your electronic products will be operating in and taking stock of the threats to reliability associated with that environment. Will the coating need to be biocompatible? Transparent? How thick should the coating be?  

Considerations may include the operational temperature range for components and integrated circuits – will the coating you choose maintain performance throughout this range? Will your product be exposed to high levels of corrosives, humidity, or even immersion, requiring a coating with strong barrier properties? Will the environment entail exposure to various chemicals? If so, Parylene’s superior chemical resistance properties may present an ideal solution for the medical and automotive industries.

Learn more about what Parylene is used for 

 

Parylene Coating Chemical Resistance

Chemically inert Parylene conformal coatings exhibit exceptional resistance to solvents at room temperature, maintaining this property to 150° C. This resistance prevents erosion, delamination, and other minimizations of coating effectiveness, ensuring dependable performance. Additionally, Parylene coatings are highly resistant to inorganic reagents, including alkalis and strong acids.

Download HZO’s Parylene datasheet

 

Parylene coating has excellent chemical resistance to solvents and reagents, including those listed below:

Acids, Bases, Corrosives
Hydrochloric acid, 10%
Sulfuric acid, 10%
Nitric acid, 10%
Hydrofluoric acid, 10%
Sodium hydroxide solution, 10%
Ammonium hydroxide solution, 10%
Hydrogen peroxide in water (H2O2)

 

Watch Dr. Sean Clancy expand on Parylene chemical resistance in his webinar

 

Organic Solvents
n-Octane
Toluene
Chlorobenzene
Pyridine
2-Propanol (IPA)
Acetone

The exceptional chemical resistance of Parylene is one of the many beneficial properties that sustain component performance for the length of its expected lifecycle.

 

Parylene C Chemical Resistance

Parylene comes in various types, including Parylene N, C, and F (VT-4), and each type has unique properties, ensuring an appropriate Parylene for every project. Parylene C coatings specifically survive exposure to the corrosive liquids and solids mentioned above and much more. Parylene C has excellent chemical resistance to most solvents and reagents used in processing electronics and other products, including (dilute / ~10 % concentration) acids, bases, and organic solvents, such as isopropyl alcohol.

Understand how chemical resistance influences Parylene removal processes

 

Why is Parylene Chemical Resistance so High?

Parylene’s exceptional chemical resistance is partially due to the unique vacuum deposition method used to apply the coatings, chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this vapor phase coating process, the polymer chains pack tightly against one another, making Parylene resistant to chemicals passing through the coating and reacting with the film.

Compared to liquid-derived and assembled monolayers, the chemically stronger film consistency is the source of Parylene’s chemical/solvent resistance.

 

Parylene Chemical Reaction

Typical Parylene deposition process, illustrated with Parylene N

 

Download our infographic for an illustrated guide to CVD

If you would like to learn more about Parylene coatings, please visit our Parylene page or explore one of our webinars for an in-depth discussion about Parylene delivered by one of our engineers. If you have decided Parylene is a strong choice for your application, please contact our applications engineering team today for a no-pressure consultation and understand our unique manufacturing advantages that drive down Parylene pricing

Read more about the advantages of working with HZO, including scalable Parylene coating equipment and Parylene masking automation.

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Parylene Biocompatibility Properties

January 7, 2022 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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As a long-proven biocompatible material, Parylene conforms to ISO-10993 and is USP Class VI implantable material. Its properties make it ideal for biological and medical applications, with additional benefits that make it a natural choice for healthcare applications. Learn more about Parylene biocompatibility and other benefits the coatings provide for medical devices.

Parylene Biocompatibility

Parylene comes in various types, including Parylene C, F (AF-4), and Parylene N, and the material has long been used as a protective medical device coating. A biocompatible material will not negatively interact with living tissue. Additionally, it is physiologically non-reactive and isn’t toxic. Parylene is chemically inert, so it can survive exposure to chemicals in and on the human body (such as implantable devices) without reacting with these chemicals.

Due to Parylene’s chemistry and structure, it is biocompatible and meets the United States Pharmacopeia’s (USP) highest standards for biocompatibility certification, Class VI standard. Parylene has passed the USP’s stringent testing process described here and has a proven track record of reliable performance in the medical device industry,

Learn more about other ways Parylene is used

 

Download the HZO Parylene datasheet

 

Benefits of Parylene for Medical Applications

 

In addition to chemical biocompatibility, Parylene conformal coating has many other properties that add value to medical devices. As a low-friction polymer coating, Parylene is a dry lubricant and allows easy sliding. Because increased friction can make a medical procedure more painful and timely, this slickness is an essential benefit for medical implants.

With a mission-critical device such as an implant, long-lasting protection against enzymes, bodily fluids, lipids, and proteins is paramount. Parylene can last for decades and has exceptional barrier properties that lead to superior corrosion resistance, excellent chemical resistance, and robust protection against liquid ingress.

Parylene is odorless and transparent, minimizing irritation, and does not require catalysts, initiators, or curing to be deposited, avoiding impurities that could disrupt its unique benefits. It also maintains protection throughout a wide temperature range

With precise control, Parylene thickness is minimal – 50% of traditional conformal coatings, with pinhole-free coatings that exhibit high dielectric strength.

 

Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

Parylene’s vapor-based deposition process creates a truly conformal, even coating desirable for applications where reliability is a priority. The highly repeatable process generates consistent results and minimizes coating defects. Several CVD services are available, including purchasing CVD equipment for sale. However, without the help of dedicated experts, endeavoring to coat your devices with Parylene can be a timely, cost-consuming process. With improper application, Parylene removal may even be necessary. 

 

Learn more about Parylene pricing

 

hzo-parylene-process-diagram-02

Illustration of the CVD Process

 

Read More about the CVD process

 

HZO Medical Coatings

As a Parylene coating company, HZO focuses on more than just producing dependable, consistent coatings. We aim to simplify the coating process with a turnkey solution, several business models, techniques,  Parylene masking automation, and Parylene coating equipment to reduce costs and make the CVD process scalable.

These benefits allow us to extend the scope of Parylene for medical devices to connected devices worn on the body, such as smartwatches, continuous glucose monitors, activity trackers, and hearing aids. With our engineers’ domain experience, we specialize in coating for the Internet of Medical Things. We believe in Parylene’s capacity to improve these critical devices that ordinarily would not be candidates for coating due to cost and scalability concerns.

If you want to speak to a team member about medical coatings, please contact us today for a consultation.

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Parylene N Properties Explained Datasheet PDF Download

December 10, 2021 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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Parylene is the generic name for poly-para-xylylenes. These conformal coatings come in several varieties, including Parylene C, Parylene F (VT-4), and Parylene N. Parylene properties provide superior barrier protection in the form of thin, pinhole-free coatings applied to components and devices to sustain product life and bolster reliability. Parylene is biocompatible and complies with REACH, RoHS, and Prop 65.

Learn more about what Parylene is used for

 

Parylene N Properties

Parylene N has the highest dielectric strength of the Parylenes, has a melting point of 420°C (or 788°F), and is a commercially available halogen-free Parylene. To see the properties of Parylene N, you can view the HZO Parylene datasheet below, under the column of HZO Zero™, our Parylene N offering, and read a short description of notable Parylene properties. (For reference, HZO Guardian Plus™ is our Parylene C coating solution, ideal for corrosion resistance).

You can also download the datasheet:


Parylene Mechanical and Physical Properties

 

Parylene has a relatively high yield and tensile strength compared to other polymer coatings, with substantial wear resistance. In general, Parylene provides superior mechanical protection.

 

Parylene N Young’s Modulus

Young’s modulus measures the stiffness of solid material or resistance to elastic deformation. The values for Tensile Strength and Young’s Modulus for Parylene N and C can be found below, as well as for polyester and polyamide.

 

Table 1: Young’s Modulus and Tensile Strength for Parylene C and N and Polyester and Polyamide

Material Young’s Modulus Tensile Strength
Polyester 7.1×105 psi MD 29,000 psi MD
Polymide 3.6×105 psi ~33,500 psi
Parylene C 4.6×105 psi 10,153 psi
Parylene N 3.5×105 psi 6,526 psi

 

 

Parylene Electrical Properties

Parylene is a superior electrical insulator with excellent uniformity, and the pinhole and defect-free coverage help the coatings prevent arcing. Although the insulating properties of the Parylene increase with thickness, they are defined by the fundamental composition of the coating. Each type of Parylene has different properties, and by selecting a specific thickness and type, you can fine-tune electricity-blocking properties.

 

Parylene Dielectric strength

Dielectric strength is the maximum voltage required to produce a dielectric breakdown through the coating material, expressed as Volts per unit thickness. This is an essential property for higher voltage design, as it protects against high voltage from static electricity and arcing.

 

Read more about Parylene’s optical properties

 

Parylene Thermal Properties

Read more about Parylene temperature range

Like all materials, Parylene coatings degrade as the temperature increases but have high melting points. The temperature stability values for the Parylenes are listed in the table below.

Table 2: Parylene Thermal Properties

Parylene Type

Long-Term Temperature Limit (°C)

Duration=~10+ Years

Short-Term Temperature Limit (°C)

Duration=~1 Month

Melting Point Temperature (Tm)
Parylene N 60 96 420
Parylene C 80 115 290

 

Read more about Parylene Removal 

 

Parylene Barrier Properties

Parylene coatings provide an excellent physical barrier protecting the coated components from electrical shorting and external contamination. The coating blocks gases that can lead to corrosion of the coated object and serves as a physical barrier to protect from sources of contamination, including foreign object debris (FOD), dust, airborne salts, and metal filings. Parylene also has exceptional chemical resistance with a chemical barrier layer. 

Gas permeability and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) are important properties for evaluating corrosion resistance; the lower, the better. The table below illustrates these properties in Parylene and other conformal coating materials.

 

Table 3: Barrier Properties of Conformal Coatings

Polymer Gas Permeability at 25 °C, (cc·mm)/(m2·day·atm) WVTR,(g·mm)/(m2·day)
N2 O2 CO2 H2 H2S SO2 CI2
Parylene C 0.4 2.8 3.0 43.3 5.1 4.3 0.1 0.08
Parylene N 3.0 15.4 84.3 212.6 313 745 29.2 0.59
Parylene F (VT-4) 16.7 0.28
Epoxy (ER) 1.6 4 3.1 43.3 0.94
Polyurethane (UR) 31.5 78.7 1,181 0.93
Silicone (SR) 19,685 118,110 17,710

 

Watch Dr. Clancy’s webinar on proven methods of corrosion resistance

About HZO

HZO is focused on increasing coating efficiency and driving down Parylene costs. We provide scalable Parylene equipment and automated Parylene masking to save time and labor within our turnkey solution. Contact us today if you are considering Parylene for your application and want to speak to an engineer.

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How Much Does Parylene Coating Cost? - All Things Considered

October 15, 2021 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Value of Coatings

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Parylene coatings are known for robust protection from liquids, corrosion, chemicals, and strong electrical activity at a fraction of the thickness of alternative coatings, such as acrylics, epoxies, silicones, and urethanes. Additionally, Parylene is biocompatible, with beneficial optical properties, and delivers superior protection at 50% thickness of conventional coatings, such as acrylic conformal coating or epoxy. However, the perceived cost of Parylene dimer and Parylene labor costs, compared to other conformal coatings, can give design teams hesitation as they consider incorporating high-reliability protection into their project.  

Read about what Parylene is used for

 

Is Cost-Efficient Parylene Possible?

 

Despite its proven performance, many perceive Parylene coating as challenging and expensive to apply. Therefore, one assumption is that it is only appropriate in extreme mission-critical situations, such as military, medical, or aviation applications. Other common misconceptions about Parylene include the following:

  • Reworking and removing Parylene is impossible
  • Parylene coating equipment is too expensive and complicated to use
  • Masking is too complex and time-consuming to bother with
  • CVD coatings (chemical vapor deposition) entail long batch times leading to higher labor costs and low throughput

Although these assumptions are unfounded, it is a fact that Parylene coating is typically the most costly of all conformal coating options. As a result, it's important to choose a partner who can work within your budget constraints and assist you in estimating potential expenses.

 

How to Calculate the Cost of Parylene

 

HZO capital equipment being used to lower Parylene coating cost

 

At HZO, we have crafted processes and procedures to lower the costs of the Parylene coating processes. However, three factors are pertinent to the price regardless of whom you work with.

 

Parylene Type

 

Common varieties, such as Parylene C and Parylene N, are less costly in raw coating material known as Parylene dimer. “Specialty types” such as Parylene-AF4 will cost more but will enable better performance in terms of UV and heat resistance. A consultation with a Parylene conformal coating services provider, such as HZO, will help you determine which Parylene type is most suitable for your project.

 

Masking

 

Masking can be more complex with Parylene coatings, resulting in increased labor. However, altering the design of your product can make it easier to coat and mask, reducing associated costs. HZO has industry-leading automated and semi-automated masking and demasking equipment, simplifying the process and reducing expenses should you choose to work with us.

 

Quantity and Size of Objects that Require Coating

 

With Parylene, the objects you need to coat are placed into a vacuum chamber as part of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coating process, and each coating run will have a fixed cost. However, you can optimize the number of components coated in each run to lower the coating cost per item. Meanwhile, we have built proprietary coating equipment that can house more items at once per coating run than any other Parylene company in the industry, minimizing costs per coating run.

 

Other Critical Considerations When Evaluating Parylene’s Price

 

Aside from considering upfront costs, to accurately assess Parylene’s coating expense, you must consider the coating’s value in terms of performance to preserve product function over time. In other words, the total cost of ownership is a critical consideration – upfront coating expense cannot fully measure value over a product’s life cycle. Parylene’s superior conformality and protection capabilities dramatically reduce field failures, warranty costs, and downtimes.

When you take the long-term view, the productivity and warranty savings that Parylene provides over time can make it the most economical coating option. There are other savings to consider when evaluating the price of conformal coatings, such as manufacturing costs. Conventional coatings entail cure cycles, VOC emissions, toxic byproducts, flammability, waste disposal, and health concerns. Parylene does not raise these safety and sustainability concerns as an environmentally friendly process.

Finally, investing in Parylene, with its exceptional dielectric strength, chemical and moisture resistance, and stress-free encapsulation, can substantially reduce the TCO to ruggedize components compared to other options.  

Want to ensure HZO Parylene meets your specifications?

 

HZO Parylene Conformal Coating Services

 

If you are interested in Parylene coatings and want to evaluate upfront costs and potential savings, contact one of our experts for a no-obligation DFM consultation.

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Parylene C Datasheet (PDF Download) - Properties Explained

August 20, 2021 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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Parylene conformal coatings come in various types, including Parylene C, Parylene N, and Parylene F (VT-4), with decades of trusted performance in critical industries and applications. The coating is often superior in barrier properties, uniform coverage, and performance, with less stress on mechanical structures, as a Parylene datasheet indicates.

Parylene coatings have good optical properties, are comparably thinner than conventional conformal coatings, and add virtually no weight to components and products. Parylene’s coating thickness can pass tests such as IPC CC-830C at 50% of the film thickness of other conformal coating materials.

Parylene coatings are unique in their ability to be polymerized and deposited by chemical vapor deposition (the Parylene coating process) onto components maintained at room temperature. As a result, the coatings are high purity, free of defects and pinholes, and ideal for meeting many electronic product design reliability requirements.

Parylene C is biocompatible, highly resistant to moisture, vapor, and corrosive gasses, and exhibits strong chemical resistance. Because of these strong anti-corrosion properties and a valuable combination of properties for most applications, from medical devices to personal computers. Parylene C is used for most products that need a conformal coating for protection.

Learn more about why Parylene is used

To see the specific properties of Parylene C, you can download HZO’s Parylene datasheet below, under the column of HZO Guardian Plus™, our Parylene C offering. For reference, HZO Guardian Zero™ is our Parylene N coating solution, suitable for halogen-free applications.

Download HZO’s Parylene datasheet.

 

For reference, a short description of each category property in the Parylene datasheet is provided, as well as some descriptions of tests used to acquire data and explanations as to why some data points might be vital for your application.

Parylene Physical and Mechanical Properties

 

Parylene is a crystalline polymer that results in generally high mechanical strength. Compared to other polymer coatings, it has a relatively high tensile and yield strength, with substantial wear resistance. An explanation for some Parylene datasheet properties is below.

 

Parylene C Young’s Modulus

 

Young’s modulus is a mechanical property that measures the stiffness of a solid material. Young’s modulus is the elongation of a material under unit stress when the deformation is elastic.

The image below depicts an example stress-strain curve which shows the change in stress as strain increases and identifies Young’s modulus and Tensile strength

Young’s modulus is the slope of the linear part of the stress-strain curve for a material under tension or compression. In other words, the strain will be proportional to stress. There is no permanent deformation either. The material will behave like a spring and return to its original dimension upon removing load.

Tensile strength is the maximum stress a material can withstand. Meanwhile, Elongation to Break is the ratio between the changed length and the initial length after the breakage of test specimen.

Parylene Young's Modulus

Image Source: https://www.thefabricator.com/thefabricator/article/metalsmaterials/the-differences-between-stiffness-and-strength-in-metal

 

The table below shows values for Young’s Modulus and Tensile Strength for Parylene C and N and polyester and polyamide.

 

Table 1: Young’s Modulus and Tensile Strength for Parylene C and N and Polyester and Polyamide

Material Young’s Modulus Tensile Strength
Polyester 7.1×105 psi MD 29,000 psi MD
Polymide 3.6×105 psi ~33,500 psi
Parylene C 4.6×105 psi 10,153 psi
Parylene N 3.5×105 psi 6,526 psi

 

Parylene C Electrical Properties

 

Parylene doesn’t conduct electricity, an essential trait for a film that coats and separates conductive areas on electronics. As the Parylene datasheet indicates, it is a superior electrical insulator (dielectric) coating since it coats every surface on a product with uniform thickness. Although conformal coatings aren’t meant to be used as the primary means of electrical insulation, they can isolate electrical ground from active traces and supplement other insulation forms. The lack of pinholes and other point defects helps Parylene prevent arcing.

A coating with variable thicknesses on an electronics assembly running at high voltage may have a greater risk of failure if the device operates near the dielectric breakdown voltage of the coating. The coating undergoes a complete failure at the breakdown voltage, and any insulative properties are left negligible or lost entirely.

An example of how Parylene deposits is depicted below:

Parylene Deposition

Courtesy of CALCE, University of Maryland

 

Though defined by its fundamental composition, the insulating properties of a Parylene coating increase with thickness. By selecting a specific Parylene thickness, you can fine-tune electricity-blocking properties. Since each Parylene type has different dielectric properties, there’s a suitable parylene for virtually every application.

 

Parylene Dissipation Factor

The dissipation factor is the reciprocal ratio between the insulating material’s capacitive reactance to its resistance (Equivalent Series Resistance or ESR) at a specified frequency.

This property measures electrical energy lost and absorbed (power dissipation) when an electrical current is applied to an insulating material. Much of the absorbed energy is dissipated as heat—the lower the dissipation factor, the more efficient the insulator system. Dissipation factor is an essential property because it can be used to maximize power delivery.

 

Parylene Dielectric Strength

Dielectric strength is defined as the maximum voltage required to produce a dielectric breakdown through the material and is expressed as Volts per unit thickness. The image below shows that the original dielectric material as an insulator becomes a conductor because the dielectric material passes the maximum voltage and produces a dielectric breakdown.

Parylene Dielectric Strength


Dielectric strength is important for higher voltage design because it prevents arcing and protects against high voltage from static electricity. Please refer to the Parylene datasheet to see the values for this property.

 

Learn about Parylene removal considerations.

 

Parylene C Dielectric Constant

Dielectric constant is the ratio of the permittivity of a substance to the permittivity of free space.

 

Dielectric Constant (k) = ε / ε0

Parylene Dielectric Constant

A sample is placed between two metallic plates, and capacitance is measured to obtain these values. A second run is measured without the specimen between the two electrodes. The dielectric constant is the ratio of these two values, and a low dielectric constant is essential for rapid signal propagation.

 

Parylene Thermal Properties

Parylene coatings have temperature limits that, when reached, shorten the coating’s usefulness. You must know your expectations and/or specifications for the product’s end-use environment to mitigate risks associated with high-temperature applications. The temperature stability values for the parylenes are collected in the table below and are based on industry literature.

 

Table 2: Parylene Thermal Properties

Parylene Type Long-Term Temperature Limit (°C)

 

Duration=~10+ Years

Short-Term Temperature Limit (°C)

 

Duration=~1 Month

Melting Point Temperature (Tm)
Parylene N 60 96 420
Parylene C 80 115 290

 

Fortunately, the Parylene C melting temperature is high, at 290 °C. Parylene N maintains performance through even more extreme temperatures.

Read more about Parylene temperature range

 

Parylene Barrier Properties

Parylenes are hydrophobic, ultrathin, lightweight, and highly conformal, wrapping around every edge available, where the coating deposits the same thickness around the components they coat. The vapor phase coating process leads to pinhole-free coatings that are also defect-free. In addition, the coatings trap and immobilize any particles that may be present on substrates.

The polymer chains pack tightly against one another, making Parylene resistant to chemicals passing through the coating and reacting with the coating itself. Parylene is impervious to moisture and insoluble in chemicals found in most end-user and industrial environments. The coating also does a good job of blocking gases that can lead to corrosion of the coated object.

The Parylenes provide an excellent physical barrier that protects the underlying objects, especially electronics, from external contamination and electrical shorting. As a physical barrier, Parylene protects from various types of problematic contamination, such as dust, foreign object debris (FOD), metal filings, and airborne salts.

Parylene C has the best barrier properties, as indicated on the Parylene datasheet, including preventing gas and water vapor penetration. The table below compares the Gas Permeability and WVTR of Parylene with other conformal coating materials.

Table 3: Barrier Properties of Conformal Coatings

Polymer Gas Permeability at 25 °C, (cc·mm)/(m2·day·atm) WVTR,(g·mm)/(m2·day)
N2 O2 CO2 H2 H2S SO2 CI2
Parylene C 0.4 2.8 3.0 43.3 5.1 4.3 0.1 0.08
Parylene N 3.0 15.4 84.3 212.6 313 745 29.2 0.59
Parylene F (VT-4) 16.7 0.28
Epoxy (ER) 1.6 4 3.1 43.3 0.94
Polyurethane (UR) 31.5 78.7 1,181 0.93
Silicone (SR) 19,685 118,110 17,710
 
Ref.: Licari, James J. Coating Materials for Electronic Applications – Polymers, Processes, Reliability, Testing. William Andrew Publishing, 2003 and various companies’ literature.

 

Parylene C also performs well when immersed in solutions of sodium chloride salt in water. The following table shows Parylene C’s performance compared to examples of epoxy, polyurethane, silicone, and Teflon™ coatings.

Table 4: Resistance of Different Polymers to 0.9% Saline Solution

Polymer Coating Method Layer Thickness (microns) Time Until Total Breakdown
Parylene C 60 25 > 30 d
Epoxy (ER) 80 100 ± 25 6 h
Polyurethane (UR) Dip Coating 100 ± 12.5 6 h
Silicone (SR) Dip Coating 75 ± 12.5 58 hr
Teflon Spraying 75 6 h
 
Ref.: Mordelt, G., Heim, P. High-Tech-Beschichtung der Zukunft, Metalloberfläche 52(5), 368 − 371 (1998).

 

In general, Parylene C performs extremely well as a barrier to corrosion due to the coating’s ability to minimize the influence of the factors that affect coating lifetime and performance, including the following:

  • Oxygen permeability − low oxygen permeability for a polymer coating
  • Water vapor permeability − very low WVTR for a polymer coating
  • Liquid water uptake − Parylene C absorbs very little water
  • Ionic permeability − salts have a difficult time passing through the coating
  • Coating porosity − at a thickness of just 5 to 8 microns, Parylene C forms a pinhole/pore-free coating

Watch Dr. Clancy’s webinar on proven methods of corrosion resistance

 

About HZO

HZO is a Parylene services provider focusing on driving down associated costs and increasing coating efficiency for Parylene’s solvent-free deposition method. We have built proprietary cubed Parylene chambers that can house more substrates than any other Parylene company. Our chambers are large in size, but the cubed shape allows for high loading density, increasing throughput, and scaling for high-volume applications.

We have also built equipment to automate Parylene masking and demasking to cut costs, save on labor, and decrease the risk of quality issues due to manually doing these processes.

To learn about Parylene pricing for your next project, contact us today. To learn about our proven track record, read our case studies.

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Parylene Coating Removal - Methods & Explanation

June 17, 2021 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Process

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In the last blog post in our removing conformal coating series, we discussed removing conventional conformal coatings, such as polyurethane, acrylic, epoxy, and silicone, from components such as printed circuit boards. Parylene coatings, however, present unique challenges regarding rework and removal.

Parylene conformal coatings are unique in their ability to be polymerized and deposited by vapor deposition onto PCBs maintained at room temperature, unlike liquid conformal coating application methods that may lead to coating defects. The result is an extremely thin, pinhole-free, high-purity coating with proven performance for mission-critical applications and consumer electronics devices that must remain reliable.

Read about Parylene Type C and Parylene Type N

Parylene is often superior in barrier properties, uniform coverage, and performance in thinner layers compared to other conformal coatings, with less stress on mechanical structures and virtually no added bulk.

Learn more about what Parylene is used for.

Additionally, Parylene has been trusted for decades due to its remarkable chemical resistance properties to withstand corrosive gases and liquids and maintain performance in extreme temperatures and intense electrical activity.

 

Want to know if HZO Parylene meets your specifications?

 

However, the beneficial properties that make Parylene the “gold standard” of conformal coating can also make the material difficult to remove. Thankfully, there are methods you can use to remove and rework Parylene when necessary.

Learn more about Parylene’s benefits, such as Parylene’s optical properties, and biocompatibility  

 

Why is Parylene Removal Necessary?

From time to time, it is necessary to rework or remove the coating. Perhaps the job specifications changed, or a Parylene vendor incorrectly applied the coating.

One example of poor application is Parylene delamination, in which the conformal coating separates from the coated surface. This results in an unattached, torn, non-conformal coating and an unacceptable finish. Delamination defeats the purpose of Parylene conformal coatings and should be avoided at all costs. Even partial lifting can render the protective coating useless.

There are many sources of Parylene delamination, including standard processes such as demasking, which can create a need for exceptional quality control inspection procedures after production. Other causes include:

Coating porosity: A difference in vapor pressure between the component surface and the Parylene coating creates vulnerability to moisture permeation and intrusion into the substrate. As pressure fluctuations and temperature subsequently occur, osmotic pressures are generated, separating the coating from the component.

Incompatible materials: The component surface and the Parylene coating must bond together for successful coverage. When the Parylene and the surface are incompatible, incongruous surface energies are generated, causing minimal bonding.

Contaminated surfaces: Improperly cleaned component surfaces do not support adhesion.

Regardless of the reason, Parylene removal must be efficient and safe to protect the integrity of the coated substrate material or component.

The following methods are popular ways to approach Parylene removal.

 

Mechanical Parylene Removal

Parylene’s strong capacity to withstand manipulation, exceptional uniformity, and overall strength means that mechanical removal methods should be used with care, as there is potential damage to the final production. However, as Parylene is a soft polymer, mechanical techniques can be candidates for Parylene removal.

Methods such as picking, cutting, and scraping are effective but run the risk of damaging components, substrates, and delicate track lines. This type of removal requires considerable attention and care. It is possible to achieve good spot removal with appropriate masking, but mechanical techniques may prove undependable for larger-scale surfaces.

Removing Parylene with Micro Abrasion

Micro abrasion is a process performed with automated or handheld human systems that pinpoint a targeted removal area, propelling inert gas or dry air, and abrasive media at the Parylene coating. This removal method is suitable for both whole board and spot removal. It is generally easy to implement, quick, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly.

Thermal Removal

Although Parylene can withstand high temperatures, a high-temperature oven or soldering iron can effectively remove Parylene in specific, small areas. As heat is applied, the coated component rises from the board and lifts off.

Although Parylene can withstand high temperatures, a high-temperature oven or soldering iron can effectively remove Parylene in specific, small areas

This technique may be adequate for small repairs. It is less reliable for large surfaces, but for particular jobs, it can still be an effective means of removal. However, residues and discoloration may occur, and due to Parylene’s high melting point, heat-sensitive substrates may be at risk for damage. Thermal removal can be challenging to manage and is not recommended without the help of Parylene experts.

thermal removal parylene removal method

 

Parylene Removal with Tetrahydrofuran

Parylene is chemically inert, resisting chemical degradation. However, one chemical has been used to strip Parylene from substrates and components, a colorless organic compound called tetrahydrofuran (THF), with a chemical formula of (CH2)40. This solvent softens the Parylene coating, temporarily loosening the adhesion bond between the substrate and coating. At this point, the Parylene can be lifted off with tweezers. Although THF can be successfully used to remove Parylene, caution must be taken to avoid damaging the coated component, and the solvent should only be used for complete coating removal. For the security of components underneath the coating, it is worthwhile to consider other removal processes before using TFH.

Laser Ablation for Parylene Removal

Laser ablation is a process that removes material from a surface by irradiating it with a laser beam. The beam can cut, drill, or mark delicate materials, providing precise removal. At HZO, a laser ablation process converts Parylene to gas or plasma with pulsed laser sources. This method can be cost-effective for complex removal jobs, results in better quality removal results, and completely Parylene-free areas and 3D devices can be effectively serviced.

Conclusion

There are multiple effective methods to remove Parylene should the need arise. Each method has its strengths, so it’s necessary to know your options and what method will be best for your project.

If you are looking for Parylene removal services or to discuss your project with Parylene experts, please message us today. While removing Parylene can be challenging, if you partner with a company with the best skillsets and processes, the job can be simplified and more cost-efficient. We can also help with scalable Parylene equipment, cost-saving Parylene masking automation, and address other concerns about the cost of Parylene services.

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IoT - Coating Consistency is Key

September 25, 2020 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Process, Coating Properties, Value of Coatings

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IoT sensors aggregate and send data to IoT dashboards, simplifying critical, complex decisions quickly. One key area where this is particularly true is the utilization of sensor data for predictive maintenance, a process that reduces downtime and lowers the total cost of ownership. Myriad other applications incorporate these “smart” sensors too.

Today, IoT sensors are ubiquitous, touching almost every aspect of life. Gas pressure sensors monitor pressure changes in oil, energy, and utility applications. Photoelectric devices (photo sensors) are now common in the consumer electronics vertical. Sensors are responsible for temperature monitoring, a typical use case for warehouse and inventory management, and HVAC systems monitoring.

Accelerometers detect subnormal industrial machine applications, while ultrasonic flow meters are coupled with IoT modules to send data about smart metering to a remote location. Moisture sensors have been critical in recent advances in smart farming, allowing for constant soil health monitoring. In the automotive sector, tunneling magnetoresistive sensors (TMR) are an increasingly popular way to measure mechanical displacement. And Particulate Matter sensors detect pollution in the industrial landscape and smart cities.

 

The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process used to deposit Parylene conformal coatings can efficiently accommodate these complex surfaces. Parylene’s usefulness is primarily founded upon its ability to cover PCBA configurations with exposed internal surfaces, sharp edges, flat surfaces, points, and crevices with consistent coverage free of voids.

 

HZO PRO750 Parylene Coating Equipment

HZO PRO750 Parylene Coating Equipment

 

The Parylene Deposition Process – Consistent Coverage

Rather than dipping, spraying, or brushing pre-formulated layers onto PCBAs and other components, Parylene’s application method synthesizes the protective film in-process. This deposition system comprises a series of vacuum chambers that produce Parylene vapor, pyrolyze the vapor, then deposit the vapor as a polymer sequentially.

During the CVD process, gaseous Parylene penetrates the layers of a PCBA. Its vaporous consistency surrounds all areas as it builds coating protection along the exterior. The coating layers are substantially thinner than those provided by liquid conformal coating materials, enhancing reliability and functional versatility.

It has repeatedly been demonstrated that CVD is valuable for thin-film deposition on irregular PCBAs. CVD's Conformal layers are exceptionally uniform, even in the nanometer range. Because these coating layers are exceptionally thin, non-uniformity is minimal.

 

Reach out to an Expert 

Choosing Parylene conformal coating services isn’t a failsafe decision, like anything else. Problems can occur with the process and the material. This is particularly true if the wrong Parylene type is used for a coating project while another type could provide better coverage. If you need a consultation to determine if Parylene is the right choice for your project, contact the HZO engineering team today, fill out a quote form, or leave a brief message.

 
 
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Parylene Optical Properties - UV Light Interactions, Refractive Index

September 3, 2020 / by Dr. Sean Clancy posted in Parylene, Protection Capabilities, Coating Properties

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With Parylene, you always have a clear and accurate view due to its optical properties. Although the Parylene deposition process begins with white to off-white dimer powder, the result is a transparent coating that retains clarity and color throughout your product’s lifecycle.

Across myriad industries, Parylene types C, Parylene N, and F are used when optical qualities are critical to product applications. Optical lenses, fiber optic components, electro-optical components, and optical sensors are frequently coated with this thin polymeric film for protection from the environment.

Learn more about what Parylene coating is used for

 

Optical Applications

Parylene has excellent transmission and, conversely, low optical absorption in the visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, which ensures desirable performance in these regions.

Parylene’s thin, transparent protection is particularly beneficial for light-emitting devices, as the colors of the emitted light and device efficiency are unaffected. Therefore, Parylene proves useful for optical devices, cameras, and LED lights exposed to challenging outdoor environments.

Read about Parylene masking and Parylene removal

 

Refractive Index

Refractive indices are an important consideration in many optical applications. These describe how much light changes in direction as it passes from one medium into another. Additionally, refractive indices help determine the dispersive power of prisms and the focusing power of lenses.

Specifically, the refractive index is the ratio of the speed of light in a vacuum compared to the speed of light in a material. Parylene N has a refractive index of 1.66, meaning that the speed of light in this Parylene type is 1.66 times slower than light in a vacuum.

Read about Parylene chemical resistance and Parylene biocompatibility.

 

HZO PRO750 Parylene Coating Equipment

With Parylene conformal coatings, you always have a clear and accurate view.

UV Light Interactions

Extended UV exposure in air degrades Parylene N, C, D, and after a more extended period, VT-4. If direct sunlight exposure is limited, the effects of the UV are not as detrimental. Both UV and oxygen must be present to raise any significant issues.

Although VT-4 is better than C and N in this regard, dimer material can cost three to five times more than C. Similarly, AF-4 is much more UV resistant than VT-4, but this dimer can cost up to 20 times more than C, with significantly more limited suppliers and availability.

 

Read Dr. Clancy’s blog posts on Parylene thickness and Parylene temperature range

 

The Big Picture

Apart from the detrimental UV light interactions exhibited with the non-fluorinated types, Parylene films provide excellent optical properties and enhance the reliability of mission-critical applications, such as aerospace, scientific, and telecommunication components and integrated circuits. If your project specifications call for products that can retain color and clarity, Parylene is an excellent option.

Do you need help from an expert in selecting a polymer coating for your next project? We can assist with scalable Parylene coating equipment. Reach out to our team today for a consultation.

 

Understand More About Parylene Coating Cost

 
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Parylene Temperature Range - Extreme Hot & Cold Temperatures

August 27, 2020 / by Dr. Sean Clancy posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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Do you need product protection that can withstand temperature extremes? Parylene may be a good option if you utilize the correct type.

Learn more about why Parylene is used

 

Parylene in Cold Temperatures

Parylene performs relatively well in cold temperature extremes. As all polymer materials cool, they become less flexible, stiffer, and more susceptible to physical damage.  Most conformal coatings crack when flexed once or twice at these temperatures, while Parylene films can withstand flexing up to six to nine times.

Learn about Parylene chemical resistance and biocompatibility 

 

Parylene Thermal Properties

As temperature increases, materials degrade, and Parylene coatings are no different. Each type has a temperature limit that, when reached, can shorten the life of the coating. As Parylene reaches the end of its lifecycle, it becomes less flexible and more brittle, forming cracks that may allow corrosive ingress, putting your product at risk.

To reduce the risk of coating failures caused by temperature extremes, let your coating provider know what you expect and your project specifications.

Read more about Parylene C and Parylene Type N

 

Melting

The Parylenes’ melting points are very high, above typical solder and other circuit board materials, so melting is not an issue when temperatures increase. However, when certain temperatures are reached, the Parylenes transition from a more ordered/crystalline state to a more amorphous/plastic state. When Parylene is heating or cooling during this transition, it's possible to cause mechanical stress on componentsbut in all practicality, the stress is minimal and rarely affects the product.

 

Learn more about Parylene's pricing considerations

 

a coating engineer looking at parylene under a microscope

 

Cracks

In cases of high temperature, most of the Parylenes undergo oxidation. Exposure to oxygen and heat causes microscopic cracks in most Parylene films, which can become severe enough to cause visible cracks to the naked eye. Once formed, a crack can potentially expose the product to possible corrosion and contamination, which is problematic. Due to their chemical structures, Parylenes N, C, D, and VT-4 are susceptible to cracks under these circumstances. However, Parylene AF-4 can survive much higher temperatures than the other types. When oxygen isn’t present, all of the Parylenes can handle much higher temperatures.

 

Read Dr. Clancy’s other articles on Parylene optical properties and Parylene thickness

 

Color Changes

Sometimes, chemical changes such as oxidation can cause physical changes, as with Parylene. When the film faces extreme exposure to heat, the typically transparent coating takes on a slight yellow hue as it is oxidized. Microcracks may also develop and grow larger. Around the edges of the cracks, the coating curls upwards with the appearance of dried mud. Additionally, if the product is in motion or the coating is flexed, cracks will quickly become worse.

Most things expand with higher temperatures and shrink with lower temperatures, and Parylene is no different. If the rate of expansion (coefficient of thermal expansion) of the coating and the coated product are similar, it is less likely that cracks will form in the coating.

 

Flammability Best Practices

Conduct flammability testing to comply with industry standards and ensure product safety. These tests have shown that Parylene N continues to burn after a flame is removed for a short time, so products coated with Parylene N may need to rely on flame retardants in the other product materials. However, Parylenes C, D, AF-4, and VT-4 contain halogens that function as flame retardants. After removing the flame, these coatings self-extinguish at once. To test for flammability, use UL 94 V for vertical burn and UL 94 HB for horizontal burn. Although industry-specific test methods may exist, the UL 94 methods are standard and ensure reliability.

 

More Information on Parylene Services

 

The Big Picture

 

Temperature limits are an essential parameter that should factor into your decision about the type of Parylene you should use for your project. If your environment is challenging, with extremely high temperatures, the more exotic fluorinated Parylenes such as AF-4 and VT-4 are good choices. If the temperatures your Parylene-coated product is exposed to are limited, Parylene N and C are available options.

Put careful thought into which Parylene to use in the early design phase so that you can fully consider product engineering recommendations that may include product design changes. Having this conversation will improve coating performance, your product’s reliability, and your company’s reputation. There is a suitable Parylene to match any need for various conditions and environments; it’s a matter of clearly conveying these conditions early in the planning process.

Do you have questions about the Parylene coating process? HZO has Parylene coating equipment, Parylene masking automation, and Parylene removal expertise to lower costs. Contact us today to speak to one of our engineers about your project.

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Parylene Coating Thickness – How Much is Enough?

August 18, 2020 / by Dr. Sean Clancy posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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If you are considering a Parylene coating for your printed circuit board assembly, you may wonder what thickness you should use. You may have surmised that the more coating, the better, but that is not always true. The thicker the coating, the longer it takes to coat – you will face diminishing returns at some point. Additionally, no universal thickness is ideal for all operating environments and applications. Different applications have different functional requirements.

To gain a better understanding, let’s look into how Parylene coating works and how to determine what Parylene thickness is most suitable for your requirements.

 

What is the Parylene Coating Process?

The Parylene chemical vapor deposition process begins with dimer, which is a powdered chemical. The more dimer that is in the first chamber, the thicker the coating will be. The dimer is heated into vapor, pulled by a vacuum into a connected chamber, and heated to an even higher temperature, further pyrolyzing the dimer. It is pulled into a final deposition chamber, penetrating crevices, coating exposed surfaces, and becoming a polymer. The resulting coating exhibits strong barrier properties at 50% thickness of conventional conformal coatings.

Read about Parylene biocompatibility and Parylene removal.

 

What Parylene Thickness is Best?

  • Are there Parylene cost considerations to meet, or do you need to meet the highest level of protection, no matter the price?
  • Are there time constraints?
  • Do you need to meet industry-standard requirements?

When Time is an Issue

Do you have a project that needed to be completed yesterday? A thinner coating may be your best bet. However, you risk breaches or pinholes in the coating when you go thin, say, 0.1 to 5 μm (microns). If your product has simple geometry or relatively flat structures, your coating will probably be pinhole-free.

But for products with more substantial differences in structural or component heights or components with more complex geometry, this level of thinness may not offer enough coating material to form a coherent film, leaving voids or pinholes. And any breaches in the film are potential pathways for the ingress of corrosive compounds and would require Parylene removal.

On the other hand, a thinner coating may provide a sufficient level of protection for products not exposed to corrosives, such as products requiring only a quality barrier against minimal exposure to contamination. Additionally, you decrease the time to coat and cost when you go thin.

 

Learn More About Parylene’s Chemical Resistance

 

a coating expert double checking the parylene coating on a PCB

 

For Product Reliability

Is product reliability the largest of your concerns? The IPC-CC-830 and MIL-I-46058 coating standards might be good references. According to these standards, thickness ranges of 12.5 to 18 and 12.5 to 25 μm, respectively, are thick enough for protection against very harsh environments. Coatings this thick are pinhole-free for a myriad of products and are time-tested, with decades of usage in demanding industries such as defense, aerospace, medical device, and telecommunications.

For products in the most demanding of environments, the NASA-STD 8739.1 standard calls for a range of thicknesses from 13 to 51 μm. This thickness is more than sufficient to provide a level of protection for incredibly harsh environments. Bear in mind, however, that at thicknesses around 50 μm, a single coating run may take well over a day, depending on the Parylene type you have selected.

 

Read about Parylene C and Parylene N

 

The Big Picture

There is no optimal Parylene coating thickness across all applications and requirements. Instead, you should select a thickness based upon several factors, such as the operating environment that your product will be exposed to, and how your customers expect to use the product. Additionally, budget and timeframe are essential factors. Although there is no perfect thickness of coating suitable for every application, with enough planning, you can find the perfect thickness suitable for yours. 

 

Read more about Parylene's temperature range

Although there is no perfect thickness of coating suitable for every application, with enough planning, you can find the perfect thickness suitable for yours.

Not Sure Which Parylene Thickness is Ideal for Your Product?

If you have questions or problems with Parylene, we’ve got a solution. To speak to an applications engineer about your specific requirements, Parylene coating cost, and how to determine which thickness is best, contact us today for a quote. We can help with automated Parylene masking and scalable Parylene coating equipment.

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Parylene - Different Types & Properties Explained

June 5, 2020 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Coating Properties

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Parylene is a chemical compound applied to substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Because Parylene coating deposits onto the surface molecule by molecule, it forms a defect and pinhole-free coating with excellent conformality. Parylene resists chemicals and can protect against caustic substances, acids, corrosion, and more. Unlike conventional conformal coatings, Parylene is ultra-thin, providing superior coverage at 50% thickness. Several types of Parylene coatings enhance its adaptability, all suited for various industrial applications.

 

What’s the Difference Between Parylene Types?

The Parylene types covered in this guide are all characterized by different chemical compositions and physical properties. Parylenes have different levels of permeability, dielectric strength, and other defining qualities. Choosing the best one depends on what application you’re using it for and what substrate you’re coating.

Here are several different types explained, including the best application use:

 
parylene n dimer

 

1. Parylene N

Parylene N consists of a linear carbon-hydrogen molecule structure. It’s the most fundamental, basic form of Parylene, making it suitable for devices with high-frequency use. This type is distinguished by its vacuum stability and low dielectric constant. When going through the deposition process, Parylene N and Parylene C have a higher deposition rate than many other types. This quality makes it convenient for commercial use, although it’s less widespread than Parylene C.

Read more about Parylene N.

Parylene N is also halogen-free. Halogens include elements like fluorine, bromine, and chlorine. This quality generally makes Parylene N preferable to other conformal coatings, as some industries require their coatings to be halogen-free. For example, halogens in electronics can bio-accumulate within living beings and can be toxic to the environment when burned.

The most common applications for this Parylene conformal coating include the following:

  • Printed circuit boards: Most Parylene types protect the delicate inner workings of complex circuitry.
  • Elastomers: Manufacturers use Parylene N to coat elastomers, polymers with weak molecular forces.
  • Electronics: Most types of this material are excellent for protecting electronic devices, whether medical or non-medical.
 
Need to see if HZO Parylene meets your specifications? 

 

parylene c dimer

 

2. Parylene C

Moisture-resistant Parylene C is similar to Parylene N because it contains a carbon-hydrogen molecule structure. However, for each molecule, it possesses one chlorine atom in place of a hydrogen atom. As a conformal coating, Parylene C provides a protective barrier for printed circuit boards. Parylene C is an ideal coating for applications that require corrosion inhibition due to its low permeability.

Like other types, Parylene C is added to a substrate using the parylene coating process, chemical vapor deposition.

Learn more about why Parylene is used

If you have a device that needs high levels of protection, Parylene C is one of the best coatings available. Here’s where you’ll often see it being used:

  • Medical Devices: Parylene C has been used in previous medical device studies as a substrate for peripheral nerve electrodes. A nerve electrode connects neurons to a brain-machine interface (BMI) and records nerve signals.
  • Microelectromechanical systems devices (MEMs): Parylene C is often used to coat MEMs devices, though it can also serve as a structural or substrate material.
  • Caustic environments: Devices that experience constant exposure to caustic substances fare better with a Parylene C coating because of the room temperature coating process, which enables pinhole-free Parylene barriers.
Parylene F (VT-4) dimer

 

3. Parylene F (VT-4)

Parylene F doesn’t see the same commercial use as the other types on this list. However, it still possesses desirable qualities, such as a low dielectric constant and great thermal stability. It also allows for a higher coating density when used in various applications. This Parylene coating is characterized by its fluorination due to having fluorine atoms in its aromatic ring.

Although it’s not as widespread, its properties can serve well for things such as:

  • Field-effect transistors: One study showed that Parylene C and F were used within field-effect transistors to produce copolymer gate dielectrics. The study’s results showed that Parylene copolymer dielectrics offered stable and high-quality performance without requiring extra manufacturing steps.
  • Microelectromechanical systems devices (MEMs): Like Parylene C, the F type also lends itself well to MEMS — especially those with high-temperature requirements.
  • Harsh conditions: Parylene F resists high temperatures and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of these properties, it could serve as a suitable substitute for Parylene C under harsh conditions.

 Learn more about Parylene temperature range

Parylene D dimer

 

4. Parylene D

Parylene D resembles Parylene C in that it substitutes two hydrogen atoms for two chlorine. Both of these materials come from the same root monomer. Parylene D, however, lacks the same ease of use that C does — especially in terms of biocompatibility. It can hold up well when exposed to high temperatures, but it doesn’t work as effectively for coating things like medical devices.

Learn about Parylene optical applications.


Parylene F (AF-4) dimer

 

5. Parylene F (AF-4)

Parylene F (AF-4) possesses high oxidative resistance and UV stability. These properties make it suitable for specialized applications. It can withstand UV exposure without experiencing surface yellowing or degrading, which adds to its durability.

However, creating this conformal coating requires a three-step process. The additional stages increase production costs while limiting the yield, so saving this Parylene for only highly specialized uses is best. These include high-temperature applications and UV radiation protection.

 

Contact HZO for Parylene Conformal Coatings

If you’re interested in coating your devices, HZO can assist you. We serve a range of industries to help device manufacturers meet specifications, no matter the products produced.

Our turnkey solution helps us meet your coating needs by providing industry-leading, state-of-the-art Parylene coating equipment and employing proven material science. We have expertise in Parylene removal and industry-leading Parylene masking automation that reduces the price of Parylene coating services. Combining the entire package, HZO can offer you a high-quality experience with a durable finished product. Contact us today to speak with one of our highly qualified engineers about Parylene coating solutions.

 
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Solving Weather & Water Challenges For Smart Farms

May 12, 2020 / by Mallory McGuinness-Hickey posted in Parylene, Protection Capabilities, Thin Film Applications, Value of Coatings

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It’s a Small World, After All

The world’s population is projected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030, an unprecedented increase approaching fast. This looming surge will compound our current problem – more mouths to feed on a densely packed planet that isn’t growing any larger.

Even as available agricultural land shrinks and natural resources become more depleted, farmers must produce 70% more food by 2050.

Necessity is the mother of invention, especially when it comes to farming. After all, if the agricultural industry doesn’t adapt, we don’t eat. The task at hand for farmers is to produce more food with more precision while working with less.

 

IoT in Smart Farming: Connecting Dots

To adjust to these changes, the industry has introduced technology to agriculture, a practice known as smart farming. Intelligent devices collect and process information about emerging issues and environmental changes, enabling farmers to respond more quickly. Pulling this system together is the Internet of Things, connecting smart machines and integrated sensors to produce data-driven, data-enabled processes.

Information about the fertility of the soil, crop growth, weather conditions, and other variables can be used to track business status, equipment efficiency, and employee performance, offering valuable insights that can be used to optimize agricultural performance. As a result, work, waste, and risk are reduced, while cost management and capabilities are enhanced.

 

Hardware Security Implications in Smart Agriculture Pose Problems

While agricultural devices hold promise, no matter how smart the software may be, the success of the smart farming system is contingent upon how physically secure the hardware is. This is problematic for several reasons:

  • Without adequate protection, sensors can easily be damaged by wear and tear caused by constant exposure to drops, falls, heavy winds, or pounding rain.
  • Typical weather conditions, such as high temperatures, pollutants, condensation, and humidity, can cause immediate failure by a short circuit or a long, unpredictable shutdown due to corrosion.
  • To operate reliably, farm managers need to access information consistently. A single sensor failure could lead to a catastrophic period of downtime at worst. At best, failing devices create the need for continuous maintenance and replacement.
one phone underwater that is still working because of HZO protection and another that is dead because of water damage

 

Protecting Smart Farming Equipment Has Never Been This Important

The onus falls on the agricultural industry to achieve more precision and a higher level of performance as it struggles to meet the demands of our population. To farmers, physically robust hardware is more important than ever.

Weather stations located across fields offer insight into climate conditions, the optimal choice of crops, and potential actions that, when taken, could improve farming capacity. Meanwhile, sensors attached to cattle are helping farmers understand changes in health and activity levels for each animal and, collectively, the status of the entire herd.

Crop management devices produce data about crop health, precipitation, and temperature fluctuations, allowing farmers to mitigate risk and increase yield proactively. This kind of cognizance is gleaned from smart farming sensors, provided these devices can predictably perform in an unpredictable environment.

 

Overcoming Challenges to Device Security In Smart Farming with Parylene Thin-Film Coatings

Considered a “best-in-class” conformal coating in electronic, industrial, medical, and engineering industries, Parylene is a thin-film electronic protection solution that can address agricultural challenges. Applied with a vacuum deposition technique, Parylene coatings achieve dependable coverage free from imperfections like cracks or voids. The coating uniformly conforms to device topography, completely penetrating spaces as narrow as <0.01 mm.

Additionally, Parylene has good heat endurance. For example, Parylene C can offer durable environmental protection for ten years at 80°C. Providing mission-critical protection at thicknesses on the micron level, Parylene can endure temperatures and weather conditions that traditionally have been hurdles for smart farming devices.

If you have been tasked with designing or manufacturing smart farming devices that the industry can depend on, Parylene is an excellent way to achieve critical reliability. Please contact us today if you’d like to learn more about our Parylene solution.

 
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