Skip to content
BLOG

Thin Film Coating Blog

Browse our blog to learn more about thin film and conformal coating processes, material, and application. Find out more about HZO and how our solutions can help your market.

What Does Waterproof Actually Mean? Seriously.

Download HZO's Ingress Protection Checklist Your shiny new smartwatch claims to be IP57 waterproof, your new phone claims to be water protected, and a slew of new electronic..

Read More

Preserving Power: Protective Coatings for EV Battery Corrosion

EV batteries promise to revolutionize transportation as we know it, but is it all positive? The future of electric vehicles is riding on the dependable operation of these energy..

Read More

An Overview of Our Parylene Coating Equipment

The original development of our coating technology began in 2007. As a coating company that now licenses thin-film protective layering technology on the back of more than 200..

Read More

PECVD vs CVD – Chemical Vapor Deposition Overview

Thin-film deposition is the dynamic process used for depositing thin-film coatings onto a substrate, part, or assembly. Deposition methods, in general, can be grouped into three..

Read More

The Evolution of Waterproofing - Medieval Waterproofing

The Evolution of Waterproofing What do a pirate ship and a Samsung S21 smartphone have in common? No, this is not the beginning of some strange joke. The truth is that all of..

Read More

Epoxy Conformal Coating Evaluation Guide

Conformal coatings are polymeric materials applied to substrates. These films are a barrier to protect electronics from environmental hazards, such as corrosion, humidity,..

Read More

Rakuten Kobo Chooses HZO | Waterproof Next Generation Ereader

Consumer requests for waterproofing made possible with HZO Technology Draper, UT – August 17, 2016 – HZO Inc., the total solutions leader in liquid and environment protection..

Read More

Don't Be Left in the Dark: Brief History of Light Emission Devices

One of the best things about working for a company like HZO is the opportunity to be exposed to an extremely wide variety of technologies (apart from our own). Our seasoned..

Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Delta Electronics Capital

As HZO prepares for its first Board of Directors meeting of 2015, we are reminded of our amazing roster of investors. For a timely topic, today we highlight another of our Series..

Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Harris & Harris Group

Today, we highlight one of the earliest private equity investors in HZO, Harris & Harris, a publicly traded company listed on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol TINY. H&H follows a..

Read More

Military Standards for Safeguarding Printed Circuit Assemblies

For certain service providers interested in working with aerospace companies or the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), it is necessary to achieve certain military standards, also..

Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Prudence Holdings

As 2014 comes to a close, we want to introduce another of our investors, Prudence Holdings, a founding investor in HZO. You may not have heard of Prudence, as this New York-based..

Read More

How Small is a Nanometer? Nanometers Explained

We live in a growing world. Every day, cars are getting bigger, buildings are getting taller, phones are getting larger, and Americans are getting wider (I can say that; I’m an..

Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Iron Gate Capital

What do an e-commerce company that serves emerging apparel brands (Branded Online), a post-bill audit and recovery service for large hospitals (AcuStream), an artificial heart..

Read More

HZO Success Story: NavELite

In 2013, Andy Wilson of NavELite faced a tough situation. As a former special forces soldier in the United States Army, Price was familiar with tight spots, but this was..

Read More

Hydrophilic vs Hydrophobic: What's The Difference?

Hydrophilic vs. Hydrophobic Today’s technical terminology can be dizzying. On an average day here at HZO you hear people throw around words like nanotechnology and vapor..

Read More

Record-Breaking Sea Kayak Journey Around Ireland

A few months back, we were contacted with news of an amazing man in Ireland who was going to attempt to break a world record- so we jumped at the chance to do our part in..

Read More

Ryan Moore


Recent Posts

What Does Waterproof Actually Mean? Seriously.

June 15, 2023 / by Ryan Moore posted in Protection Capabilities

0 Comments


HZO's Ingress Protection Checklist

Download HZO's Ingress Protection Checklist

Your shiny new smartwatch claims to be IP57 waterproof, your new phone claims to be water protected, and a slew of new electronic devices are entering the market boasting ‘water resistance.’ Yet, all of these devices may not survive an encounter in the rain or an accidental drop in the toilet. So, how do you know what’s what in the world of water-protected electronics?

Clever advertising and loosely applied water protection ratings have led consumers to believe that the stamp of an IP rating or a water-resistant buzzword means that the device in question can take a dip in the pool or, at the very least, hack it in the shower. But sadly, that’s usually not the case.

 

So What’s The Problem?

As manufacturers have tried to meet the growing consumer demand for water-resistant electronics, they have emphasized citing IP Code ratings. As beneficial as these ratings can be in certain situations, there is one major flaw: they don’t tell the whole story. Here’s the truth about IP and IP57 ratings.

 

 

What Does IP57 Really Mean?

An IP rating is a standard for water resistance in electronics. Water resistance is measured by numbers 1 through 9. There are two types of IP ratings, which include:

  • Two-digit IP ratings: Two-digit IP ratings are used to indicate both water and particle resistance. The first digit displays particle and solid resistance, while the second digit shows the water protection level. If you own an electronic that has an IP rating of IP57, that device offers level 5 particle resistance and level 7 water protection.
  • One-digit IP ratings: Unlike two-digit ratings, one-digit IP ratings are metrics designed to show water resistance only, which means an ‘X replaces the first digit.’

For example, a rating of IPX7 would offer level 7 water protection out of 9 levels and is defined as can be submerged up to 1 meter in water for 30 minutes.

Is IPX7 Waterproof?

Well, that’s kind of a long story.

When a device claims to be waterproof or water-resistant, it’s important to understand that these terms may not always carry the meaning you expect. Waterproof means impervious to water and all of the destruction that comes with it.

Ultimately, it all depends on the manufacturer and the level of water resistance for which you’re looking. Different IP ratings offer different types of protection, and you need to understand them if you want to have a better grasp of whether or not your IPX5, IPX7, or IP57 device is genuinely waterproof.

 

one phone underwater that is still working because of HZO protection and another that is dead because of water damage
 
IP and IPX Standards

It can be challenging to follow vague waterproof marketing terms when you have little to no reference for what the actual numbers and ratings mean. Let’s go through a few of the IP rating standard basics.

The water protection numbers exist on a scale of 1 to 9, while the solid protection metric operates on a scale from 1 to 6. Some of the most common numbers used to indicate high levels of water resistance are IPX5, IPX7, and IP57, each of which offers a different type of protection:

  • IPX5: An IPX5 rating implies that a device can endure direct contact with water that’s projected from a nozzle.

  • IPX7: IPX7 is one of the highest ratings, and ideally, it means that a device is durable enough to survive after being submerged in up to 3 feet of water for 30 minutes.

  • IP57: IP57 indicates a high (though not the highest) protection level from dust and water exposure.

The issue with these ratings is that it can be hard to tell whether they’ll apply to real-world situations. To gain an IP certification, all an electronics manufacturer must send their device to a third-party laboratory to run the standard tests. If one (yes, just one) passes the test, the entire device line gets the determined IP certification. See the problem here?

So, one tenacious device passes the IPX7 test, and the whole team gets to play as ‘IPX7.’ And with the sparkling new certification comes a heaping pile of consumer confusion. “Does IPX7 mean waterproof?” “Does IP57 mean water-resistant?” “What can I actually do with my device?”

 

When Traditional Ratings Fail

To truly understand what your ‘water-resistant device’ is capable of, you need to read, and we might add, carefully read the manufacturer's terms and conditions. Let’s take a hypothetical, newly introduced ‘waterproof’ Android, for instance. The phone is advertised as “Waterproof*. Dust-tight. Worry-free.” It also maintains an IP65 and IP68 rating. But what does the asterisk mean?

If we look a little closer at the fine print, we find that the phone should never be put completely underwater or exposed to seawater, salt water, chlorinated water, or liquids such as drinks and juices. And if the ports and covers aren’t firmly closed, all protection bets are off.

So What’s The Answer?

HZO is seeking to detangle the web of confusion that is currently surrounding the ‘waterproof electronics’ market by offering a superior water protection solution. A solution without limits, boundaries, or fine print. Using next-generation conformal coatings, HZO creates a thin film barrier between the vital circuitry of the electronics and any liquid or debris that could potentially harm it. No need for seals, gaskets, port covers, or cases, and in theory, no real need for confusing IP standards. HZO Protection is the standard.

If you’re looking for a solution that can make your products more robust and, well, better, we’re here to help. Our coatings can help make a wide range of electronics more usable from almost any location, enhancing product reliability and, even better — saving money.

To learn more from a skilled professional about how we can help your product exceed IP57 and IPX7 ratings, contact us today.

 
 
Read More

Preserving Power: Protective Coatings for EV Battery Corrosion

June 15, 2023 / by Ryan Moore posted in Thin Film Applications

0 Comments

EV batteries promise to revolutionize transportation as we know it, but is it all positive? The future of electric vehicles is riding on the dependable operation of these energy storage vessels, so their reliability is vital. Unfortunately, like all mechanical and chemical processes, battery technology isn’t foolproof and is susceptible to failure, especially in the hazardous environments in which they perform. To better understand EV battery weaknesses and address them, it’s key to understand their origins and what steps are being taken today to safeguard against potential failure points, no matter the circumstance.

 

Download HZO's automotive electronics brochure 
 
 

How Old is the Electric Car?

 

The electric car is synonymous with the future of transportation. However, few may realize that its inception dates to 1881, four years before Karl Benz designed and built the first practical internal combustion vehicle. When consumers were polled in 1900 at the National Automobile Show in New York, the design was so popular that they voted electric vehicles the top choice over steam and combustion engines.

So why did the combustion engine ultimately win the race to mass adoption? Because of the same technical challenges facing EVs today: batteries. Early 20th-century battery technology was no match for the stored energy found in gasoline, nor could the average consumer purchase these primitive batteries due to price constraints.

 

EVs are Gaining Speed

However, in the early 21st century, battery technology has significantly improved, and the cost is within an affordable range. Finding solutions to these legacy problems has led to a staggering projected growth rate of 1,177% for EVs globally from 2020 to 2030.

 

Ensuring a Long Road Ahead

With this projected growth comes the compounding headache of ensuring the batteries operate reliably. Millions of drivers, commuters, and enthusiasts blindly rely on their vehicle’s battery to function as intended, no matter the driving conditions.

What are the potential points of failure in today’s batteries, including the rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries used to power EVs? Two natural threats can stop a battery, and therefore the vehicle it is powering, in its tracks: corrosion and strong electrical activity.

  • Corrosion: Corrosion is a common enemy to virtually all electronic components, and battery systems are no exception. This natural process occurs when a refined metal is converted to a more stable form, such as its hydroxide, sulfide, or oxide state, leading to the material’s deterioration.
  • Strong electrical activity: Strong electrical activity, including short-circuiting, can wreak havoc on EV battery technology. Where corrosion can be a slow killer, short-circuiting can instantly damage sensitive battery circuitry and components, potentially causing irreversible harm to the vehicle and its occupants.

These threats can be addressed safely and thoroughly through protective conformal coatings such as Parylene.

 

Protecting battery components with Parylene coatings

Corrosion and intense electrical activity can be prevented by properly coating susceptible components within the battery ecosystem. Parylene is a microns-thin conformal coating applied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), a polymerization process unique to the material, responsible for its pinhole-free and truly conformal properties. Not only does Parylene provide a barrier against corrosive liquids to the parts it is applied to, but the material itself is a strong dielectric, capable of withstanding strong electrical activity. Parylene coatings provide ideal protection to EV battery components, including circuitry, busbars, and cold plates.

Download HZO’s Parylene datasheet

 

  • Battery Circuitry: Every PCB is susceptible to corrosion when left to the elements. EV batteries exposed to typical automotive environments, including rainwater, salt, corrosive chemicals, and more, are no exception. Parylene coatings adhere tightly to the complex topography of a PCB, minimizing the risk of any exposure to corrosive liquids and gases.
  • Busbars: Busbars distribute power from high-energy battery packs to e-motors, e-axles, and other assemblies and components. If a battery busbar fails, power cannot be efficiently distributed to other vehicle functions, including the drivetrain or e-axles. The vehicle may also not be able to charge. For consistent operation, busbars require a dielectric coating, such as Parylene, with excellent adhesion, corrosion, and chemical resistance combined with mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.
  • Cold Plates: Overheating can lead to thermal runaway if a cold plate fails, resulting in fires and explosions. Cold plates require protective coatings that strongly adhere to the substrate, can be used in operating temperatures from-40°C to +180°C, and provide excellent heat, oil, and moisture resistance to prevent overheating. These components also require a dielectric coating that protects against water, deionized water, Glycol and water solutions, and dielectric fluids. Parylene coatings can fill these needs.

Testing Parameters: Temperature – 35°C, Concentration – 5% NaCl by weight, Duration – 168 hours

 

HZO Parylene for EV Battery Component Protection

The electric car has come a long way since its advent in 1881, and we’re barreling towards mass adoption in the next ten years. It’s critical, however, that these vehicles perform as expected to preserve the precious cargo on board. EV batteries are susceptible to failure in the service environments they find themselves in and require proven protection while minimizing weight and cost.

Watch a webinar on improving electronic performance in harsh service environments

It’s crucial for engineers and design teams to not only find a solution to ensure reliability on the road but find an application partner capable of applying the coating consistently and effectively. HZO has gone through the PPAP process, so you can be assured that we have met the associated manufacturability and quality standards laid out by our automotive customers. We have also demonstrated the aptitude to meet the necessary specification requirements and produce parts that consistently meet these requirements during the actual production of parts for these clients.

HZO has a unique ability to coat large, complex boards and components due to proprietary coating and automation equipment, handling parts in large qualities, and producing repeatable quality coatings with high yield rates. Our customer-focused solutions can be delivered with several flexible end-to-end business models as our team of dedicated engineers and SMEs walk clients through every step of the way of the coating process. Are you interested to see how we could help with your EV battery protection needs? Request a quote today.

 

 
 
Read More

An Overview of Our Parylene Coating Equipment

June 6, 2023 / by Ryan Moore posted in Parylene, Coating Process

0 Comments

The original development of our coating technology began in 2007. As a coating company that now licenses thin-film protective layering technology on the back of more than 200 patent filings, it can be said that we’ve come a long way since our humble beginnings. HZO now successfully protects millions of complicated digital devices from the ill effects of liquids, sweat, humidity, dust, or other contaminants.

Today we wanted to give a little nod to our origin story and provide a high-level introduction to a material that serves as a building block of our technology.

Learn more about Parylene C and Parylene Type N

Parylene Protection

Parylene (or Poly(p-xylylene) as it’s also known) is a protective layering material deposited with a chemical vapor deposition process. The resulting material is a moisture-resistant, dielectric thin film barrier that has been used for over five decades on a wide range of corrosion-resistant products. Parylene is biocompatible, has good optical properties, and is chemical-resistant. Think big. Think powerful. Parylene has been protecting equipment, components, and products used throughout some of the most advanced industries in the world.

Read more about why Parylene is used 

HZO has developed its proprietary technology utilizing Parylene as a building block and, over the years, has developed its chemistry, specialized processes, automated Parylene masking equipment, Parylene removal processes, systems, and methods of commercialization that together form a powerful and unique conformal protective solution.

 

Parylene Overview

So why have most people never heard of it? A major obstacle to Parylene becoming more widely adopted in other markets and on many other products, including consumer devices, has been largely due to the cost of Parylene deposition systems and parylene coating material.

Learn more about Parylene coating cost considerations

Not only does the Parylene deposition system and raw material have a history of high price, but over the years, there have been challenges associated with things like scalability, manufacturing integration, device complexity, and what has historically been a manual process for masking and damasking sensitive areas that need to be protected from the protective layering (i.e., the process of protecting certain components from the protective layering material).

To the credit of Parylene companies that have been in that market for much of this journey, the technology has improved dramatically over time, and the material has a sterling reputation in certain markets where development has been focused. But what about other industries that need the same kind of powerful protection?

Learn More Parylene Temperature Range

 

HZO Parylene Coating Equipment Broadens the Scope

 

HZO Parylene coating equipment

 

HZO has broadened the usage scale for this powerful, organic material by making it available to companies and manufacturers that would not have considered it an option until now. The application’s utility is what separates HZO from other companies in the Parylene space.

We talk a lot about the power of the Total HZO Solution. This includes more than our thin-film protective layering technology that protects digital devices from corrosive liquids; it also includes the advances in equipment, integration, and highly specialized processes required to protect some of the world’s most complicated digital devices. Years of driving the technology forward have positioned HZO as the leader in developing custom solutions for digital devices, utilizing Parylene as part of that equation.

These ongoing innovations get passed on to every company we have the privilege of working with, and HZO has made the benefits of Parylene more accessible and affordable to more companies than ever before. As a result, more liquid, sweat and corrosion-resistant products are reaching the hands of consumers. The change in performance is starting to get noticed, and the cry for better protection on consumer devices has never been stronger.

Contact us today to learn more about how HZO is expanding, improving, and repurposing a powerful technology with a proven track record of keeping digital devices safe.

 

 
 
 
Read More

PECVD vs CVD – Chemical Vapor Deposition Overview

May 7, 2021 / by Ryan Moore posted in Coating Process, PECVD Coatings

0 Comments

Thin-film deposition is the dynamic process used for depositing thin-film coatings onto a substrate, part, or assembly. Deposition methods, in general, can be grouped into three categories – liquid coating deposition techniques, physical vapor deposition, and chemical vapor deposition. This article will focus on chemical vapor deposition and one of its variants, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD).

 

Download our white paper on choosing the correct coating methodology for your next project:

 
 

Chemical Vapor Deposition Methods

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods (including but not limited to CVD, PECVD, and atomic layer deposition, ALD) are done under vacuum, well below atmospheric pressure, as the process deposits layers of material molecule-by-molecule or atom-by-atom. With these techniques, thin-film layers can be deposited in the range of nanometers to sub-20-micron, compared to traditional deposition, which yields coatings at 50-500 microns.

Read "How Small is a Nanometer?" 

No matter the method, vapor deposition produces coatings that alter the substrates’ electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties. The resulting dry coatings are durable and have reached optimal properties without curing at the end of the production cycle.

Below is an overview of the chemical vapor deposition process.

 

Overview of the Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

The CVD process deposits materials, including Parylene, in a vacuum chamber by vapor deposition polymerization. The item to be coated is exposed to one or more precursors, which decompose or react on the surface. In the instance of Parylene, a solid dimer is vaporized to gas. Before entering the deposition chamber, the gas travels through a pyrolysis chamber that cracks the dimer into two di-radical monomers. The monomers adsorb onto the substrate as a polymer.

 

an Overview of the Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

 

Chemical vapor deposition is used to augment substrate surfaces in ways that traditional modification techniques cannot. Polymerization by CVD allows for thin coatings with properties such as lubricity, weather resistance, and hydrophobicity.

Chemical vapor deposition is a repeatable process that produces consistent coverage and reliable results. Applications include:

Many hybrid application techniques arise from CVD, evolving to modify the properties of fabricated thin films. Among these variants, PECVD is a method that can extend the applicability of the technique for reactive and inorganic materials, inert materials, and various precursors. This technique is discussed below.

Overview of the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a variant of CVD; however, it uses plasma energy instead of only thermal energy to deposit thin films. The plasma is typically created by radio frequency, direct current, or microwave discharge that energizes reactant gases, such as silane or oxygen, to form a plasma. The deposition equipment uses a mixture of ions, free electrons, radicals, excited atoms, and molecules to deposit thin-film coatings to the substrate. Parts in the chamber are bombarded with energetic ions (plasma) that form a thin-film layer on the surface made from metals, oxides, nitrides, and/or polymers (fluorocarbons, hydrocarbons, silicones).

 

PECVD Process Diagram

 

 

PECVD-deposited films have excellent physical properties because they are uniform, highly cross-linked, and generally resistant to chemical and thermal changes. Plasma-applied polymers are extensively used in optical coating and dielectric films due to their lower cost and higher efficiency properties. Offering excellent control of material properties (stress, refractive index, hardness), PECVD also produces films used in the semiconductor industry for device encapsulation, surface passivation, and isolation of conductive layers.

Different film compositions can easily be adjusted to produce organic thin films on large substrates (glass and silicon) with varying chemical, thermal, optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. PECVD has also recently been used for many biological applications, including medical device protection, and is also used to avoid corrosion in optical and dielectric devices.

This nanocoating process can use various materials as coatings, including metals, oxides, or silicon, which may offer more flexibility than CVD. Applications include:

  • Fabrication of electronic devices to isolate multiple conductive layers, capacitors, and for surface passivation
  • Solar cells, semiconductor devices, and optically active device applications due to optical, mechanical, and electrical properties
  • Processing of printable electronic devices due to high process efficiency, large-scale patternability, lower cost, and environmentally friendly nature
  • SiN (silicon nitride) PECVD films are used for semiconductor applications due to higher capacitance density, breakdown voltage, and particle performance.
  • SiC (silicon carbide) PECVD films have demonstrated promise in developing high-temperature withstanding MEMs devices.

Read more about nanocoating material

CVD Benefits

When used with Parylene, CVD brings many benefits to the table, including:

  • Ultimate thin-film barrier material for liquid water, water vapor, and harsh chemical corrosion (acid, alkali, organic reagents)
  • Excellent dielectric strength to provide dielectric and insulative protection across an extensive range of frequencies
  • Highly conformal and adherent to many surfaces (metals, glasses, plastics, silicon, ceramics)
  • Entirely non-toxic (safe for all human contact, including implantable devices) and green (non-hazardous processing)

Download our introductory guide to protective coatings

 

CVD Drawbacks

In comparison with PECVD, CVD can have the following drawbacks:

  • Higher cost: long deposition time (10-20 hrs) need for masking/demasking (80%-line cost), and high precursor (dimer) cost
  • Relatively thick film (typically 10µm minimum thickness needed for high integrity pinhole-free conformal coating)
  • Limited operating range/life due to the aging effects of heat (>50°C), oxygen (air), and UV (sunlight) exposure
  • Low wear resistance and mechanical durability limits use on exterior surfaces (cases, enclosures)

PECVD Benefits

PECVD offers the following benefits:

  • Ability to create “nano”-thin barrier films (50nm+) with low stress (room temperature process)
  • Lower cost: due to fast deposition times (accelerated by RF field) and relatively low cost/low use precursor materials
  • No need for masking/demasking to prevent coating on non-target part areas: the coating may be shielded using the part-holders
  • High tailorability: recipe changes facilitate diverse coating properties, including hydrophobic surfaces, UV protection, oxygen resistance, reworkability, and more

PECVD Drawbacks

In comparison with CVD, PECVD can have the following drawbacks:

 
  • Barrier performance is weaker than Parylene and highly dependent on the film thickness, layer count, and plasma type.
  • Limited wear resistance: materials are typically soft (enables rework but exacerbates handling issues).
  • Some coatings may be halogenated, raising health and environmental concerns.

Although this article has provided an overview of CVD and PECVD, it is only a high-level discussion. Chemical vapor deposition processes are a good choice for thin-film deposition, but selecting the proper method takes significant experience and technical acumen from a domain expert. HZO offers highly customizable protection solutions with both CVD and PECVD processes. If you have difficulty deciding which thin-film deposition method to use, contact us today to consult with our engineers.

Read More

The Evolution of Waterproofing - Medieval Waterproofing

April 1, 2021 / by Ryan Moore posted in Protection Capabilities

0 Comments

The Evolution of Waterproofing

What do a pirate ship and a Samsung S21 smartphone have in common? No, this is not the beginning of some strange joke. The truth is that all of these items, at one time or another, have been labeled as “waterproof.” Let’s take a look at the history of waterproofing and how we got to the waterproof solutions that exist today.

 

Medieval & Ancient Waterproofing

Over the years, the definition of what makes an item waterproof has changed quite a bit, so let’s start at the beginning. Long before using special technology or chemicals, like those used in modern-day waterproofing, people used substances found in nature like tar, pitch, oil, or wax to give objects waterproof qualities.

 

How Were Wooden Ships Made Waterproof?

On ships, tar or pitch waterproofing was the most common method used. Wooden boats were made water-resistant by putting tar in the boat's hull. The pitch or tar sealed the wooden boards of the ship together, keeping water out and allowing the boat to float. Sailors also utilized oil on their sails in another form of waterproofing. This trick started back in the sixteenth century when sails were greased with oil to help the fabric withstand the harsh sea environment and better survive the battering rains that come during an intense storm.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the use of wax also began to surge in popularity as a waterproofing method. The general consumer of the nineteenth century could weave wax-covered threads into clothing to give them waterproof fabric. Later in the twentieth century, the aviation industry covered fabric wings in waxed fabrics to waterproof them in case of bad weather. All these ancient forms of waterproofing, whether by tar, oil, or wax, shared the common goal of keeping water off or out of an object. These waterproofing techniques were soon replaced by much more reliable options.

 

20th Century Waterproofing

Moving forward 100 years, the title “waterproof” is now everywhere. For example, anyone can purchase aerosol waterproofing for fabrics. The next evolution in waterproofing was the invention and use of mechanical plugs and seals in devices designed to prevent water damage in any sensitive components that could be damaged by coming in contact with it. Mechanical seals and gaskets essentially work as a plastic, or rubber, physical barrier between parts of the device and the water outside.

These seals allowed devices to be used in new ways and taken to new places. The problem with these seals, however, is that they are temperamental. Any change in temperature or pressure causes the seal to expand or contract, breaking the waterproof closure and allowing water penetration into the device or object. Sudden bumps or drops can also affect how these mechanical seals fit, as can errors in user application.

 

Learn more about HZO Coatings

 

Modern Waterproofing

Jumping ahead to the present, a new era in waterproofing solutions was born with the entrance of thin-film nanotechnology waterproofing companies like HZO. Yet, according to the strictest definition, even this highly advanced technology is not considered “waterproof.” The definition of waterproof, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is: “impervious to water; especially: covered or treated with a material (as a solution of rubber) to prevent permeation by water.”

This thin-film protective coating technology changed the entire idea of waterproofing by allowing water inside of a device while still keeping it perfectly functional. So perhaps it is time for Merriam-Webster to update its definition. Modern waterproofing doesn’t require that an object be “impervious to water” but that it keeps working even while fully submerged. In short, HZO’s technology changed the way the world defines waterproofing.

 

 

With the way technology has evolved over the years, it is clear that the next evolutionary step in waterproofing will be here. Here at HZO, we are excited to be a part of an industry that always provides innovative and revolutionary products that will continue to define the future of waterproofing electronic devices. For more information on HZO and our revolutionary waterproofing technology, please message us.

 
 
 
 
Read More

Epoxy Conformal Coating Evaluation Guide

May 21, 2020 / by Ryan Moore posted in Conformal Coatings, Coating Properties

0 Comments


 

Conformal coatings are polymeric materials applied to substrates. These films are a barrier to protect electronics from environmental hazards, such as corrosion, humidity, chemicals, and liquids. Popular conformal coating materials include silicone, acrylic, Parylene, and urethane. Epoxy is another coating material of choice in applications where chemical and abrasion resistance are priorities.

 

What is Epoxy Conformal Coating?

Epoxy coatings are protective layers with excellent electrical, thermal, mechanical, and moisture barrier properties. 

Epoxy coatings have the following attributes:

  • Very robust, difficult to remove the protective coating
  • Excellent chemical and abrasion resistance
  • Very rigid conformal coating
  • High dielectric strength

Epoxy Conformal Coating Applications

Epoxies are highly abrasion-resistant and tough and, therefore, common in applications with harsh environments, including automotive, marine, and military. Different types of epoxies have different benefits as well. For example, thermally conductive epoxy can protect boards with components that give off heat. Meanwhile, flame retardant epoxy is useful for fire hazard protection, and clear epoxy allows for board visualization.

 

epoxy conformal coating
 

 

What Does Epoxy Conformal Coating Protect Against?

Epoxy conformal coatings resist chemicals, alkalis and acids, moisture, organic solvent, and salt spray. They are known for excellent adhesion to various substrates without needing primers and retain adhesion under many conditions. Additionally, they have good electrical characteristics, and these parameters remain stable despite humidity or elevated temperature.

 

The Epoxy Conformal Coating Process

Applying epoxies with dip coating, brush, or spray application techniques is easy. With dip coating, a component is immersed in a tank of coating material, while brushing entails manual application by an operator. The spraying method can be automated or manual, depending on production needs. Epoxy materials come as either a single or two-part compound and require curing with UV or heat exposure.

Learn About Conformal Coating vs. Potting

 

Why Choose Epoxy Conformal Coating to Protect Your Electronic Devices?

Epoxies are a common coating material choice due to their strong barrier properties, ease of processing, and low cost. That said, the toughness and durability of epoxy coating may pose challenges with rework and removal. Film shrinkage may occur during polymerization, potentially causing issues, and the suggested thickness for epoxy coatings can reach up to 130 micrometers. This thickness may prove too bulky for applications that entail miniaturization.

Understanding material properties and how they meet your requirements is a good start if you are trying to determine which coating material is best for your PCB. However, other factors must be considered, including masking, cleaning, inspection, scalability, coating removal, and avoiding and addressing defects. For a big-picture view, read our guide to choosing the best coating or learn more about coatings’ protection capabilities. Alternatively, please contact us to speak to a coating service expert about your application one-on-one. 

Read More

Rakuten Kobo Chooses HZO | Waterproof Next Generation Ereader

August 17, 2016 / by Ryan Moore posted in Value of Coatings

0 Comments

 

Consumer requests for waterproofing made possible with HZO Technology

Draper, UT – August 17, 2016 –  HZO Inc., the total solutions leader in liquid and environment protection technology, announced its recent collaboration with Rakuten Kobo to protect its latest eReader, the Kobo Aura ONE. The HZO Protected™ Kobo Aura ONE is rated to IPX8, making it a versatile device that enables people to read in more places than ever.

HZO’s innovative thin-film coating solution will provide the Kobo Aura ONE with unmatched protection from damage caused by liquids and moisture without the need for bulky cases or mechanical seals, making Kobo’s new eReader sleeker, lighter and safe to use anywhere, including the beach or even in the bath.

Kobo conceptualized the Kobo Aura ONE with the input of its most avid readers. Of all their requests, water protection made the short list of the most desired features. With the customer in mind, Kobo answered the call for liquid protection, turning to HZO to make their customers’ desires a reality.

HZO collaborates extensively with product designers, engineers, and OEMs to integrate its protective technology into manufacturing. “An HZO Protected device lasts longer and performs better due to the internal application of HZO’s innovative protection layer,” said Max Sorenson, Chief Technology Officer at HZO. “Our transparent coating is microns thin, adds virtually no additional weight, and offers unmatched environmental protection.” This unique technology, combined with HZO’s collaborative engineering, made possible the IPX8 capabilities of the Aura ONE.

HZO enables OEMs and manufacturers by combining collaborative engineering with its patented manufacturing processes and its unique Parylene-based coating to protect electronic devices and components of all sizes and levels of complexity. OEMs can offer superior environmental, liquid, and submersion protection without compromising their devices’ design or overall performance.

The HZO Protected Kobo Aura ONE will be available globally in September; for more details: https://www.kobo.com

###

About HZO:

HZO is a technology solutions and licensing company that provides electronics manufacturers and device makers in a range of industries, including consumer, medical, military, and industrial, with thin-film protection against damage caused by liquid submersion, corrosive environments, humidity, sweat, dust, and debris. With a scalable end-to-end solution that supports mass volume production and a technical team dedicated to innovation and customer success, HZO’s patent-protected solution enables product design freedom, delivers product differentiation, and goes beyond the boundaries defined by electronics testing standards like IPX8.

Read More

Don't Be Left in the Dark: Brief History of Light Emission Devices

April 28, 2015 / by Ryan Moore posted in Protection Capabilities, Thin Film Applications

0 Comments

One of the best things about working for a company like HZO is the opportunity to be exposed to an extremely wide variety of technologies (apart from our own). Our seasoned technicians test and validate new products daily, from minuscule medical sensors to large electronic display boards. The technology driving these amazing devices is astounding. We could go on and on about the cool and fascinating technology that passes through an HZO production floor, but today we wanted to focus on one; the “Light Emitting Diode” or LED.

Behind most innovative technologies is an interesting story. Years and even centuries of trying, testing, and arduous development go into every bit of technology we now take for granted. The same is true of the “LED.” LED bulbs and displays have been in the mainstream for almost a decade now and are continuing to saturate the lighting world, but instead of focusing on the future applications for the technology, let’s review its history:

  • 1907 – An Englishman named Henry Joseph Round discovers that inorganic materials (specifically, raw silicon carbide) can light up when an electric current is applied.
  • 1921 – The Russian physicist Oleg Losev again observes the “Round effect” of light emission. In the preceding years, from 1924 to 1930, he published 16 papers outlining the LED and its applications.
  • 1935 – French Physicist Georges Destriau discovers light emission in zinc sulfide. Today Destriau is credited as the inventor of electroluminescence.
  • 1951 – The development of a transistor marks a scientific step forward in semiconductor physics.
  • 1962 – American Dr. Nick Holonyak Jr. develops the first visible red LED. This marked the beginning of the industrially-produced LED.
  • 1968 – The Monsanto Company produces visible red LED’s on a massive scale and becomes the first to produce affordable LEDs.
  • 1971 – Due to the development of new semiconductor materials, LEDs are produced in new colors: green, orange, and yellow. The LED’s performance and effectiveness continue to improve.
  • 1993 – Shuji Nakamura develops the first brilliant blue LED, which would be critical in developing the white LED. Nakamura (along with Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano) would win the 2014 Noble Prize in Physics for this discovery.
  • 1995 – The first LED with white light from luminescence conversion is presented and launched on the market two years later.
  • 2006 – The first light-emitting diodes with 100 lumens per watt are produced.
  • 2010 – LEDs of multiple colors are being mass-produced with luminous efficacy of 250+ lumens.

Only a century ago, people accustomed to lighting candles and cleaning kerosene lamps stood in awe at the reliable glow of the incandescent lamps developed by Thomas Edison and his contemporaries in the late 1880s and early 90s. Now all we have to do is turn on our oversized TVs, glance at an electronic billboard driving down the freeway, or check the electronic scoreboard at a ball game to see what light has become. LEDs are everywhere, and we see them incorporated more into outdoor signage and advertisements. HZO is excited about this. These LED boards are exposed to everything Mother Nature can throw at them, and unless they are protected from the elements, the vital electronics will inevitably fail. HZO’s thin film barrier is highly reliable and able to extend the life of electronics thanks to our ability to meet the unique requirements of our customers. HZO goes well beyond water protection: It exceeds industry standards for salt, humidity, and temperature testing. As well as protecting against dust and debris, HZO coatings are transparent. So when protecting massive yet intricate LED boards, don’t settle for anything but the best.

 

 

 
 
 
Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Delta Electronics Capital

April 14, 2015 / by Ryan Moore posted in About HZO

0 Comments

As HZO prepares for its first Board of Directors meeting of 2015, we are reminded of our amazing roster of investors. For a timely topic, today we highlight another of our Series B investment groups, Delta Electronics Capital, and one of our Board Advisors, AJ Dye.

Delta Electronics Capital is the investment arm of Delta Electronics, a Taiwan-based global leader in power and thermal management solutions. Delta Electronics Capital focuses on growth equity investments and strives to achieve the best balance between return and risk.

HZO is an excellent strategic fit for Delta Electronics and its mission to provide innovative, clean, and energy-efficient solutions for a better tomorrow. HZO’s chemistry is 100% organic. Our value proposition is to protect electronics from damage caused by everything from sweat and humidity to full and extended water and other liquids submersion. With HZO applied, electronics last significantly longer than devices with no protection and devices protected with inferior methods, including mechanical seals, acrylics, and urethanes. Devices incorporating HZO technology can potentially reduce tons and mounds of electronic waste.

HZO Board Observer, AJ Dye, works in the Denver office of Delta Electronics Capital, identifying and managing minority investments and acquisitions across North America in late-stage and middle-market energy, technology, and healthcare companies. In addition to HZO, AJ also holds advisory positions at SynCardia Systems, Inc., the exclusive provider of the Total Artificial Heart, and Wells Fargo’s Cleantech Innovation Incubator (IN2), which is co-administered by the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

We appreciate and look forward to AJ’s continued advice and ideas as HZO rapidly accelerates its growth trajectory.

 
 
 
Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Harris & Harris Group

February 12, 2015 / by Ryan Moore posted in About HZO

0 Comments

Today, we highlight one of the earliest private equity investors in HZO, Harris & Harris, a publicly traded company listed on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol TINY. H&H follows a distinctive investment approach, described as BIOLOGY+, the intersection of biology and interdisciplinary innovation from other technical fields, including materials science, chemistry, physics, engineering, and electronics.

The H&H team spends significant time tracking and discussing promising new technologies. In HZO’s case, H&H foresaw the emergence of wearable technology and realized that for wearables to go mainstream, they needed to be safe when exposed to sweat and water and their resulting corrosion.

HZO is a good company in the H&H portfolio, including investments in other electronics-related companies, including semiconductors, telecommunications and data communications, and metrology and test measurement.

Read More

Military Standards for Safeguarding Printed Circuit Assemblies

January 30, 2015 / by Ryan Moore posted in Protection Capabilities

0 Comments

For certain service providers interested in working with aerospace companies or the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), it is necessary to achieve certain military standards, also referred to as MIL-STD or MIL-SPEC. So, what exactly is a MIL-SPEC? These specifications define and standardize the technical requirements for materials that the DOD may purchase. The standards were established starting back in the 1960s to ensure reliability, maintainability, and to prequalify suppliers, thus lessening urgent supply chain demands.

 

In HZO’s business of protecting electronics from environmental contamination, the MIL-SPEC we keep a close eye on is MIL-I-46058C, which is the specification that lists the technical criteria for conformal coatings along with the requisite quality assurance tests and their testing protocol. The HZO material is based on para-xylylene, a polymer serving as an insulator and protective barrier to safeguard printed circuit assemblies.

Although MIL-I-46058C was deemed inactive for new designs, this requires more explanation. Isn’t that always the case? MIL-I-46058C does not detail a workmanship standard, nor is it a definition of quality. Rather, the spec ensures the tested material is suitable as a conformal coating for electronic assemblies. Even though deemed inactive, MIL-I-46058C remains the defining standard for companies who supply conformal coatings for two important reasons: it is the only published standard that includes a qualified product list used by the DOD, and the standard also requires certification by an independent third party.

Like all things, MIL-SPEC is one part of the equation. Choosing a protective barrier starts by defining requirements, including the environments to which the electronic assembly will be subjected. That’s the best way to keep electronics safe from damage.

 

 
 
Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Prudence Holdings

December 29, 2014 / by Ryan Moore posted in About HZO

0 Comments

As 2014 comes to a close, we want to introduce another of our investors, Prudence Holdings, a founding investor in HZO. You may not have heard of Prudence, as this New York-based private equity firm keeps a low profile while quietly building a roster of transformative and disruptive businesses. Prudence’s strategy is simple: proactively search for ways to solve big problems, then partner with experienced management teams to make them a reality from disrupting real estate with Urban Compass, traditional financial services with Blockchain, talent access with Thuzio, micropayments with ChangeCoin, smart household devices with InSensi, and of course, disrupting a world where liquids no longer destroy electronic devices by investing in HZO.

“We love what we do at Prudence,” commented Gavin Myers, Head of Direct Investments and HZO Board Member. “We believe that every one of our investments can transform an industry. The business case for HZO makes sense: billions of devices are sold annually, and virtually none are offered with liquid protection — and the only proven technology besides HZO is mechanical seals. But, seals have a lot of drawbacks: they are costly to implement, deteriorate and loosen with time, and do not scale down as devices become thinner and thinner. HZO solves all of these drawbacks.”

This holiday season, we tip our hat to the team at Prudence for playing a pivotal role in advising HZO and helping us shape our management team as we continue our mission to transform how electronics are protected from water, other liquids, dust, and corrosion.

Read More

How Small is a Nanometer? Nanometers Explained

November 14, 2014 / by Ryan Moore posted in Coating Properties, PECVD Coatings

0 Comments

 

We live in a growing world. Every day, cars are getting bigger, buildings are getting taller, phones are getting larger, and Americans are getting wider (I can say that; I’m an American). But here at HZO, we are getting smaller. In fact, we are obsessed with getting smaller. Every day our engineers, chemists, and recently added physicist work tirelessly to make HZO’s already minuscule technology smaller and even less invasive.

The prefix “nano” is used in many different industries and in many different contexts, but no matter the situation, it is used to describe something that is really, really, incomprehensibly tiny. In fact, it’s used to describe and measure things on the molecular level.

But how small is small? Let’s put it into perspective.

  • The Empire State Building is more than 443,000,000,000 nanometers tall.
  • Shaquille O’Neal is 2,160,000,000 nanometers tall.
  • A single hair on your head is 100,000 nanometers wide.
  • A common germ is about 1,000 nanometers wide – I don’t know about you, but the fact that we can measure a germ makes me want to wash my hands more often.

 

So what’s the big deal? Why does this matter? At just 5,000 nanometers, our coating is 20X thinner than a single strand of hair (and if you’re counting, that’s 43,200X thinner than Shaq). Unlike other materials, HZO’s nanotechnology bonds to practically any surface and creates a tight, conformal layer that keeps corrosives and contaminants at bay. Our nanocoating process offers a robust protection solution against liquid submersion for electronic components and devices. Since our micro-thin material is applied directly to the electrical components, there is no change in the weight, look or feel of the device after the treatment has been applied.

So, long story short, and a few useless facts later, HZO protects your devices in ways that no other technology can by applying a thin film that is durable and consistent, protecting electronics from corrosion and failure that occurs as a result of exposure to any kind of liquid. It protects at the microscopic level, and it doesn’t just keep water and other liquids away from the all-important electronic components, but it literally changes how these liquids and corrosives react to the protected surface. Contact us today if you have a device or product you want to protect.

Read More

HZO Investor Profile: Iron Gate Capital

September 25, 2014 / by Ryan Moore posted in About HZO

0 Comments

What do an e-commerce company that serves emerging apparel brands (Branded Online), a post-bill audit and recovery service for large hospitals (AcuStream), an artificial heart company (Syncardia Systems), and a fast-casual restaurant chain (Smashburger) have in common? Each of these companies and HZO is a member of Iron Gate Capital’s exclusive portfolio and the lead investor in HZO’s Series II growth funding.

 HZO is fortunate to have access to the savvy partners of Iron Gate, a private equity firm comprised of seasoned operating executives who invest their own capital in compelling opportunities. Iron Gate’s strategy is to target companies with proven products that meet real market needs, making no investments in either seed or early-stage venture deals. This investment validates that HZO has cleared major start-up hurdles and is now squarely operating in an accelerating growth stage of development.

In addition to tapping the experience and knowledge of the Iron Gate partners, HZO also has gained access to the firm’s investors and their networks to assist HZO in managing its dramatic growth. Iron Gate’s impressive group of private investors includes current and retired CEOs and Presidents from highly successful companies across a wide range of industries. HZO is already tapping this collective experience to ensure we flawlessly execute our customer agreements and continue to be the leading liquid protection solution across industrial applications, life science devices, and consumer electronics.

Stay tuned to the HZO blog to learn more about other investors who support the HZO mission.

 

 
 
 
Read More

HZO Success Story: NavELite

September 8, 2014 / by Ryan Moore posted in Thin Film Applications

0 Comments

In 2013, Andy Wilson of NavELite faced a tough situation. As a former special forces soldier in the United States Army, Price was familiar with tight spots, but this was different. His new product, a ruggedized backlit wrist compass developed with a former military colleague, was designed to help improve ease of navigation for military personnel and outdoor adventurers alike. Well into production, though, his team realized that the ultrasonic welding engineered to protect the battery of the backlit compass was not preventing liquid ingress, and water was getting in and shorting the light.

 “We weren’t sure what we would do,” noted Wilson. “The design was finalized, and the ship deadline was only a few months away, but our product did not meet our standards.”

What happened next could be considered serendipity, but shortly after the problem arose, Andy met one of HZO’s Business Leaders, Jaren Beckstrom, at a trade show in New Orleans.

The conversations in Louisiana acted as the catalyst for rapid action planning, and Jaren quickly mobilized the HZO technical team to start analysis on the device to discover and correct the failure points with a customized solution that would protect the battery. Once the analysis was complete and the application process implemented, the battery and compass were put through vigorous prolonged submersion tests to ensure ongoing functionality exceeding the rigorous demands of military spec requirements. The end result? A ruggedized and durable military compass that could survive the most hostile environments thrown at it.

“Not only did HZO solve the ingress problem, but NavELite decided that the value add to our product was powerful enough that it was worth highlighting HZO’s protection as the differentiating feature,’ Wilson said. ‘We ended up promoting the technology on our website and in our marketing materials, and even put HZO’s logo on the wristband to let customers know that a model of our compass had a superior level of protection.”

The results for the NavELite are a textbook example of how HZO Protection adds real value to products that need reliable protection from liquid submersion or any kind of corrosive environment.

Today, the wrist compass is a standard issue for service men and women worldwide and has attracted a variety of press attention, including a feature in Maxim Warrior, a reality show featuring Special Forces teams utilizing their skills to compete against one another.

The overwhelming demand for the HZO-protected NavELite compass has proven most exciting to us. When the company started selling the HZO Protected device, the waterproof wearable immediately took off, outselling the unprotected version 9:1 at a $50 premium. Proof that when HZO collaborates closely on a project with a partner, the solution provides a superior level of security for devices and has the power to drive demand and create an additional revenue stream for device makers, brands and manufacturers.

NavELite’s wrist compass featuring HZO Protection is available for purchase via the company’s website. Hop over to their site, look at this unique device, and see how an early adopter of HZO technology is benefiting from the power of superior liquid protection.

Read More

Hydrophilic vs Hydrophobic: What's The Difference?

November 14, 2012 / by Ryan Moore posted in Protection Capabilities

0 Comments

Hydrophilic vs. Hydrophobic

Today’s technical terminology can be dizzying. On an average day here at HZO you hear people throw around words like nanotechnology and vapor deposition as casually as if they were talking about their neighbor’s cat.

Today, we will decipher a few of these words and talk more about what two of these terms, in particular, “hydrophilic” and “hydrophobic,” actually mean. Along the way, we will clarify how the two are similar and different and show which one applies to our HZO technology.

Curious? Keep on reading.

 

What Does Hydrophilic Mean?

Hydrophilic, defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, is “of, relating to, or having a strong affinity for water.” This essentially means the ability to mix well, dissolve, or be attracted to water.

 

What does Hydrophobic Mean?

Hydrophobic, defined by the same dictionary, is defined as “resistant to or avoiding wetting.” Practically the opposite of hydrophilic!

 

What’s the difference between the two?

According to these straight definitions, we can see that these two terms are opposites. Something defined as hydrophilic is attracted to water, while something hydrophobic resists water. This means when hydrophobic items come in contact with liquids, water is encouraged to bead up and roll off the surface- almost pushing it away as a magnet pushes away metal objects.

A great example of something that is hydrophilic is self-cleaning glass. This special glass has been engineered and coated with a nano-sized, thin film. Instead of allowing water to form into droplets that bead up and roll off the glass, this cool nanotechnology helps tiny water molecules glide over the surface in a sheet, washing dirt or other debris away.

 

 

For an example of a hydrophobic substance, look no further than HZO technology. Our thin-film nano-coating encourages water and other liquids to bead up and roll off whatever it is applied to, be it a cell phone, tablet, or tiny circuit board. Although this isn’t the main property of our different coatings (we would rather brag about the actual physical barrier it creates between liquids and the important electronic components being coated), the hydrophobic properties are an added bonus.

Which coating is better? Well, within the electronics industry, we want to keep water away from the important electrical components inside of devices. A coating that causes water to bead up and roll away will keep electronics alive and well long after contact with water – so the hydrophobic coating wins this time.

These days there are a lot of other nano-coating products out there that claim hydrophobicity yet don’t measure up. Not HZO.

 

 
 
 
Read More

Record-Breaking Sea Kayak Journey Around Ireland

June 4, 2012 / by Ryan Moore posted in Value of Coatings

0 Comments

 

A few months back, we were contacted with news of an amazing man in Ireland who was going to attempt to break a world record- so we jumped at the chance to do our part in supporting him on his amazing journey.

Today, June 4th, Adventurer Mike Jones of Cobh, Co Cork, Ireland, is setting off in his 18-foot long sea kayak in an attempt to paddle around the entire country of Ireland in a mere 35 days, hoping to not only break the current world record in the process but also raise €10,000, (which equals about $12,000,) Children’s Sunshine home and Laura Lynn house- both organizations that care for children with life-limiting conditions.

We were lucky enough to be able to send Mike one of our favorite toys for his adventure- an HZO Protected iPod Nano to keep him company while he paddled. He was excited to test it with a few barrel rolls in his kayak and test whatever the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea could dish out.

Mike will have a tracking beacon on his kayak, so hopefully, we will receive updates on his progress as his journey progresses. We wish him luck and will keep you posted on his progress!

 
Read More